Village Coordinator Annual Reports 2010

Villages A-F

| A | B | C D | E | F |

Villages G-L

| G | H | J | K | L |

Villages M-R

| M | N | O | P | R |

Villages S-Z

| S | T | V | W | Y | Z |

VC Newsletter Editor Michael Frank


 

 

  • Alexandertal (Neu-Schilling), Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report

    The following has been the Alexandertaler activity for this period.

    November 9, 2009 - I responded to an inquiry about the Sattler family

    February 10 - Gary Martens, village coordinator for our mother colony, Schilling, informed me that digital camera copies of the birth and confirmation records, including some Alexandertal births, can be found at Christ Lutheran Church in Winnipeg, Manitoba.  These are available at http://www.germanrussian.org/Christ_Luth_conf/.  The Alexandertal births are given in jpeg file #13 for Maria K?ill 1898; in File #16 for Amilia Sattler 1901 and Anna Seifert 1900, in #30 for David Schmidt 1908, and in #31 for Emilie Strackbein 1907. Anyone interested in these individuals will be happy to find that their full birth dates are available in this source.

    May - There were several exchanges about the Reil family.

    September-October - I ordered a translation of the 5-page Alexandertal entry in the A.N. Minkh Historical and Geographical Dictionary of Saratov Province published in Saratov in 1898. I paid $175 for it and eagerly await its arrival. I would certainly appreciate any contribution by fellow Alexandertalers towards that cost. If you are up for that, please e-mail me at dickkraus1@yahoo.com and we will arrange it!

    November – I learned that the the Newsletter Editor for the Central California Chapter-AHSGR in Fresno, California plans on publishing an article in their Newsletter on Alexandertal, using material from the Alexandertal website.


    Dick Kraus
    Village Coordinator for Alexandertal

  • Alt-Danzig, Kirovograd
     

     

  • Alt-Schilling Saratov, Volga

 

  • Alt-Schwedendorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson

     
  • Alt-Weimar

    2010 Village Report

     

    Surnames for Alt-Weimer include Arne, Bischoff, Braun, Bretmann, Flath, Frank, Gerlach, Götze, Heinze, Horst, Iskam, Kahl, Martin, Meier, Metzler, Michel, Schimpf, Schlotthauer, Schmidt, Schuckmann, Seifert, Seÿfried, Weber, Weimer, Wunder, Ziegler, and Zimmermann.  The source list of these village surnames was the 1857 Census from Brent Mai received in the early part of 2010.

     

    Alt-Weimar was founded in 1861 by Lutheran colonists from Galka, Stephan, Schwab, Dobrinka and Moor.

     

    Villages in the Lower Volga region were given a fixed amount of land, as described in the history section.  Land was divided, and re-divided periodically, among the households and families in the village.  By the time of the 1850’s, the amount of land for each family was so small that families could no longer grow enough crops to both use as food and sell for income.

     

    The solution was to found new villages, called daughter colonies, in parts of the Lower Volga region where no villages existed.  Most of these villages were on the east side of the Volga River.

     

    Leland Riffel

    Village Coordinator for Frankreich, Neu-Galka, Strassburg, Neu-Weimar, Alt-Weimar, & Weimar

 

  • Amilchin (Emilchin, Emilcin, Amilcin) Volhynia,
    Ukraine, Russia

 

  • Anton, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report
     
    There were some interesting inquiries for the village of Anton this year.  Anton was a small German village about four miles west of a Russian village, Achmat, which was situated on the Volga River across the river from the German village of Kukkus.


    In the last year of Anton as a German village, a high percentage of the original settlers still had family members living in Anton, according to a report sent to me by a member of a Nazarenus family who still lived there at that time.


    One request for information came from a granddaughter of a woman who had lived in Anton and had come to the United States as an adult. The granddaughter wanted to know if there was any information on her family. I was happy to tell her that years before the lady had died I had interviewed her about her life and her family and was also able to copy family documents. I had the opportunity to give this information to her.  This is the type of contact that keeps a Village Coordinator looking for more stories and records.


    Also in 2010, Reinhold Haun sent an e-mail from Germany saying he was compiling a book on Anton. I've tried to contact him about it. Since my written German is not so good, I will continue to try to contact him in English.

    Information was sent to a Baumgartner family from the censuses that are available. A Nazarenus relative is doing research on his family. We keep waiting for more census reports on Anton and are always looking for the next family story or pictures that can be shared.

    Betty Engel Muradian

    Village Coordinator for Anton

     

  • 2010 Village Report
     
    2010 was a positive year for the Balzer group.
     
    Release of the Kulberg Lists and an article provided by Dick Kraus gave new leads into finding the German origins of ten Balzer settlers. To date, baptism and marriage records have been found for nearly 50 percent of the first settlers.
     
    Inquiries were received from The United States, Canada, and South America. These were answered as detailed as possible, but the gap in information after 1857 causes problems connecting to the older records.
     
    Presentations were given at two California chapters, informing members how to find their German origins.
     
    On the negative side, the newsletter is still on hold pending my personal lightened workload.  I am trying to find another person willing to edit and compile these newsletters.
     
    We are looking forward to amazing progress in 2011 with additional presentations, new members, new German origins and hopefully renewal of the newsletter.
     
    Wayne H. Bonner

    Village Coordinator for Balzer

     

  • Bangert, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report

    There are now approximately 6,000 names in the Bangert data base.  I have received three inquiries for this past year about souls who lived in the village of Bangert.

    Research materials available for Bangert:
    ·        Censuses for 1798, 1816, 1834, 1850, and 1857.
    ·        1942 overview of Bangert from 52,000 feet, taken by the Germans.

                     They wanted to know where all the bridges were over the Volga River.
    ·        Computer data base with approximately 6,000 names.
    ·        Budingen marriage records.
    ·        18 Pleve family charts, not all from Bangert.
    ·        Unpublished book, by Paul Koehler, “WE’RE GLAD THEY CAME”, which explains why they left Germany, the journey to Russia, family history in Stahl am Tarlyk and Bangert, German/Russian women, Brotherhood history, the last song, and the game of Bannock (bones).
    ·        Historical events, memories and family notes.
    ·        Unpublished book, by Paul Koehler, “GROWING UP ON ROCKY WEED ROAD”, a series of short stories about growing up on a German from Russia family farm.
    ·        Individual family history for: Koehler, Reitz, Loeb, Bea, Sinner, Zander, Haberman, Kletter, Treu, and Damm.
    ·        The German Brotherhood history.  
    ·        Village of Bangert information beyond the census.
    ·        E-mail list of people researching Bangert.
    ·        List of everyone who inquires about individuals of each village and their e-mails. I can put them in touch with others who are looking for the same names. It works!!!
    ·        Pictures taken in 2002 of the present village of Bangert


    Paul Koehler

    Village Coordinator for Banger

     

  • Bauer

2010 Village Report

I have received a total of three inquiries from AHSGR members within the United States and have had no requests from abroad.  Information on the Schreiner, Fisher/Fischer, Wagner, Golbroth/Galbroth and Herring families were provided from my research records and all available census data.  One interesting item that we are trying to research further is that several families from this village apparently immigrated to Mexico around 1898 and then relocated to the United States where other Bauerites had previously homesteaded in both Oklahoma and Kansas.  A list of these families along with the exact area where they settled in Mexico is being compiled and researched.  Any guidance or information in this area would be appreciated.
 
I did have a breakthrough with my Bierig ancestors with the newly published Kulberg List by Igor Pleve that came out this year.  Previously, I had not been able to locate the surname or any variation in any of the First Settlers Lists or the Oranienbaum Lists published by Brent Mai.  The Kulberg List has an Andreas Burich on page 54 who has a son George who matches the exact age of my first known ancestor in Bauer.  The family appears to have come from Danzig which is in current day Poland.  Not sure if this is the gathering point or the place where they actually lived?
 
In the coming year, I hope to obtain additional information about the village from the Engels archives.  A common gap for all inquiries is between the last known census for the village (1857) through the first wave of immigrants to the United States.   I am also looking into creating a village website that will centralize lineage information and village history.  Thanks to everyone for all of your assistance and encouragement throughout my first year as a village coordinator.  Best wishes for the Holiday season and Merry Christmas!
 
Respectfully,
 
Michael A. Buck
Village Coordinator for Bauer

  • Borodino, Bessarabia

    2010 Village Report

    (Bessarabia, South Russia)

    The year 2010 has been busy as usual.  Like 2009, more and more descendants of the Borodinians around the world are discovering my web site.

    For those who have not visited the site I have different methods of dealing with the family charts. I have gone into the records and placed them onto the site as-is. There are no corrections, deletions, or
    speculations. They are what they are. Then I took these names and tried to match children with their parents, and I have clearly marked these as speculations. The next part contains the family charts of people who have sent me their information which may be the same or slightly different from the records. I've then placed all my e-mails and letters under each section. There are names from A to Z. There are individual family pages with stories, letters, and photographs.

    Connected to this are my own personal ties to Borodino through both my maternal grandparents, Ludwig Michaelovich Hein and Christina Schweikert (Schweigert/Schweickert). Both were born in 1885 in Borodino. I knew them both and heard many stories about Borodino and nearby villages. To add to this, my paternal side was also German-Russian who settled in and around Worms/Odessa, South Russia. By the time I found most of my ancestors, I discovered their lives and migrations cover the area from Bessarabia to Tifilis in the Caucasus Mountains. It has been a great adventure and I have shared much of it with you.

    Hein and Schweikert:
         http://www.remmick.org/Hein.Genealogy/index.html
    Remmick of Worms / Odessa and Hoffer of Neudorf /Odessa:
         http://www.remmick.org/Remmick.Family.Tree/index.html

    Added to all of this has been the entering of the 1835 Borodino Census. The 1850 Borodino census is still in progress.  I've completed A - Q.

    I have many kinds of maps.

    I must have hundreds of photographs. When you have time, please stop by and take a look at my web sites. Who knows, you might find ancestors or information of interest.
         Genealogy: http://www.remmick.org/Borodino.Bess.Genealogy/index.html
         History: http://www.remmick.org/Borodino.Bess.History/index.html

    My German-Russian House Recipe site continues to grow because of all the generous people who have contributed.   The web address is http://www.remmick.org/GRHouseRecipes/Page1.html.

    A comment is needed to those whom I've failed to reply this last year.  Due to my father's death and my aging mother, I may not have been replying as quickly as I have in the past. But I will reply and get
    YOUR Borodino family's page up and running as soon as I'm able.  Please, e-mail me, again, if I haven't contacted you by January 1, 2011.

    Again, I'd also like to thank Ingrid Ruele who has gone into the records in places where I never could have reached and has willingly shared.  Steve Mogck’s web site has been a real treasure.  He's not
    returned my e-mails, but that doesn't prevent me from thanking him for all his hard work here and now.  Of course, there are far too many names to mention here.  They are mentioned on my web
    sites.  I can't forget my distant cousin in Germany, Alfred Hein, who has sent me many, many photos of Borodino and a collection from the Heimatmuseum.

    http://www.remmick.orgGRMemorabilia/index.html

    I am happy to say that my father's photos taken while in CCC Camp in Montana (1938-1939) have been taken up by the states museum: http://www.remmick.org/CCCCamp.RemmickSite

    There are always misspellings, typos and errors so if you discover any, please contact me.  All additions are welcome!

    Judy Remmick-Hubert
    Village Coordinator for Borodino

     

  • Brabander, Samara, Volga

     

  • Brunnental, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report
     
    This year was a busy year again for the village of Brunnental/Brunnenthal.  I continue to find new families through my ongoing research using "Ancestry.com".   I've renewed my subscription for another year, as I'm still busy updating one family at a time with census information, military records, death records, passenger listings, naturalization records and passport records.  I have not kept an exact count of queries, but just this past week I heard from a 16-year-old Goettmann fellow from Mainz Germany who is related to me.  What a delight to connect with the younger generation.  We’ve been SKYPEing and connecting on FACEBOOK and sharing photos and family information ever since.   The Internet has opened so many wonderful ways to communicate!

    I've said this before but although I keep thinking that I have found all of the families that emigrated from Brunnental, I continue to find more and more each year!  With each family I find, I write letters to living members, asking for additional info and early photos of the families.  I currently have 48,000+ names in my Brunnental database with extensive documentation on each family.  I’m continuing to gather photos for each family.

    I've put together a comprehensive list of all passenger lists of those from Brunnental which can be found on our village website.

    We have also put together a listing of all those Brunnentalers found within the WWI DRAFT REGISTRATION RECORDS which can be found online at Ancestry.com.  This listing of WWI Draft Registrations can also be found on our website.

    We also have an ongoing "listserv" through Rootsweb, where those who are interested in sharing information about Brunnental can "join", and then receive emails from anyone else who has also joined the list.  This is where I post such things as obituaries, passenger lists as I find them, or other interesting information about our village.  It's a great way to keep in touch with everyone, and only send ONE EMAIL to reach everyone.   You can join our listserv from the Brunnental webpage.

    This year we started a FACEBOOK group for Brunnental, and it can be found at:   http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/group.php?gid=227886932609.  We have been in contact through FACEBOOK with many new Brunnental descendants.  I have posted photos of Brunnental there in hopes of attracting new followers.

    I, of course, could not do any of this research without the help of all of the descendants from the village of Brunnental.  You are such an enthusiastic group of people, and you keep me motivated to continue to gather the history and genealogy of our village.  Thanks!!!
     

    Sherrie (Gettman) Stahl
    AHSGR Village Coordinator for Brunnental, Samara, Volga, Russia

     

  • 2010 Village Report

     

    This year I have not received any inquiries for Chasselois .  That is not surprising since it was a village destroyed and the survivors fled to surrounding villages, many to Mariental and Louis. The village of
    Chasselois is spelled so many different ways, and some of the spellings are almost unrecognizable to me.  Last year I missed one because of the spelling and had it pointed out to me that they believed it was meant to be Chasselois.  I am now collecting a list of all the different spellings of the Village
    name from which to have them refer.

     Now that I have sent my report, I will start a new file for the inquiries that I will receive in 2011, beginning with today's date.

    My life consists of living half the year in Arizona and the other half in Kansas.  When I am in Kansas I do not have a full reference library with me and sometimes have to get back to them at a later date for further information as it is impossible to take everything along with me for the summer.  Everyone has been so patient with me under these conditions.

    I have so many plans for my villages, and not enough time.  My book about my Mom and Dad is nearly finished.  I will be publishing it next month, hopefully.  I will then be able to spend more time on gathering more information on the villages.

    I will continue to publish a quarterly Newsletter which I did accomplish even with all the time spent on my book.
    I plan to vastly enlarge my web page after first updating it.
    I plan to collect many more family genealogies of my villages
    I plan try to gather pictures of the families.
    I plan to continue with my gathering obituaries
    I plan on making a full display of my villages to bring to the conventions.

    It has taken me four years to put my book on my parents together and although I would help the inquiries that I received, I did not spend a lot of time on all of the plans I have for my villages.  There is so much to do now but I felt my book had to take priority at this time in my life.

    I am hoping to have a lot more to report next year.


    Thelma Mills
    VC for Mariental, Louis, and Chasselois

     

  • Dehler, Saratav, Volga
     

     

 

  • 2010 Village Report

    I had my usual four to six inquiries regarding a name from Dinkel.  I supplied what information I had for them. They were quite grateful to find some answers.  I received three inquiries from Germany but could not help two because their information only went back to 1892 and mine only goes to 1857. I sent information to the other person who was a Nikolaisen.  We might be related, but again, her Dinkel ancestor was born in 1892, so all I could was speculate about the relationship.

     

    I received the new 1850 and 1857 Dinkel censuses from Brent Mai and have been updating my data with it.  From Sharon White, village coordinator from Warenburg, I received much help with some of my people.  I did help two people with the Dinkel name at the Lincoln Convention.


    Leroy Nikolaisen

    Village Coordinator for Dinkel

     

  • Dobrinka, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report  

    Thanks to contributions by a number of people researching their ancestors from Dobrinka, in August 2009 I was able to place an order for copies of all available church records for Dobrinka.  These records were received during the first 6 months of 2010 and include the following:  birth records for 1852-1867 & 1882-1894 (900 pages with 7-10 births per page), Deaths during 1904, Marriages for 1894, 1895 and 1905, and the Family Communion List for 1834 - 1846 (180 pages).   The Family List is apparently unique among church records available in the Volga region because it contains what amounts to family group sheets for almost all families in Dobrinka during the period of 1834 - 1846.  These records, created by Pastor Johann Hasthoffer, give birth dates for all people in a family born or living during the 1834-1846 time period , marriage dates and locations, spouses maiden names and birthplaces, all grouped by families.  So it provides information not available in either the 1798 and 1834 census.  The arrangement I made with those who contributed to the purchase was that all records would be available to contributors of at least $100, and people can continue to contribute that amount to get access to all records, or a smaller amount to get access to records for one surname. 

    Extraction of the information from the Family List was completed in February 2010, and distribution of the information is done on a web site I maintain. The Dobrinka database was updated with the information from the Family List.  Family group sheets were printed, in PDF format, for each family in the Family List, and these files were place in a password protected folder on the web site, with additional folders under the Dobrinka folder for each surname in the village.  The files are there for contributors to print/save to their computer at any time.

     Extraction of the birth records is ongoing.  Birth dates, birth record number, and baptism date (if the month is different than the birth date) are added to the Dobrinka database. The birth record number is recorded so that the original record can be easily found in case people want a copy of the original church record.  Births were not recorded in chronological order of birth, but when the birth was reported to the Lutheran pastor.   Some births, in later years, were recorded as much as 1 year after the birth.  Parents are matched with information already in the database.  If a mother’s information can be matched with a record already in the database, a family group sheet for the mother is printed in PDF format, along with a family group sheet for the father.  These family group sheets are uploaded to
    another web site that I maintain, which has a password protected folder for Dobrinka, along with individual folders for each surname in the village. Because of the large amount of storage required for this part of the project for both Dobrinka and Galka, I was able to find a bargain on web site hosting with BlueHost.com, which provides me with unlimited online storage for $60 per year.  PDF files are named by the full name of the father (or mother) along with birth year and FGS in the name.  Individual detail
    reports (Master Genealogist report) are also printed for people who immigrated to the US, Canada or Argentina and additional details about the family are known.

     Dobrinka had 6 daughter colonies (Neu-Galka, Alt-Weimar, Neu-Weimar, Eckheim, Erlenbach, Oberdorf), with translated 1857 census being available for all but Oberdorf.  These censuses help greatly in determining parents of children born in the 1860 to 1865 time period, and later.

     I continue to maintain a website for Dobrinka information at http://www.dobrinka.org/. The website includes several histories of the village, including the history written by A. N. Mink, and found in the
    Historical and Geographical Dictionary of the Saratov Province (Saratov, Russia, 1898).  A list of surnames of people who lived at Dobrinka is available, and a list of people researching their ancestors from Dobrinka, which shows surnames they are researching and the researchers email address.
    Resources include pictures of people from Dobrinka who immigrated to the US and Canada.  There is a report from a visit to Dobrinka in 2001, and pictures of the village taken in 2007 and 2008.

    Several dozen inquiries were received involving people from Dobrinka.  The inquiries were from people in the US, Canada, Argentina, Germany and Russia. The inquiries from Germany and Russia usually result in connecting people in the Dobrinka database, although it usually takes a number of emails trying
    to determine the oldest people that the descendant knows about from the village.  The Dobrinka database has 13,000+ people, with another 8,000 expected when the extraction of the Dobrinka birth records is complete.

    My primary genealogy program is The Master Genealogist, which is unlike any other program in its ability to record all aspects of a person's life using over 100 event items (tags).  I have also experimented with making family/surname charts using the very versatile chart making capability found in recent versions of Family Tree Maker (2009 and later), and plan on making charts available to researchers, at a yet undetermined price.  The charts will either be printed with a wide format printer, or printed by FedEx Office (formerly Kinko's).

     Gary Martens
    Village Coordinator for Dobrinka

     

  • Dönhof, Saratov, Volga

    2010 VC Report

     
    There have been several inquiries this year for Donhof, but the year has not been quite as active as the previous one.  One of the inquiries was from Russia.

    I am continuing my research on local German-Russian families and though some are not from Donhof, I feel that the local research is pertinent to the continuing search for information.  This research is an ongoing project for the German-Russian church that we have obtained and are continuing to restore.

    I am currently working on translating letters for a Donhof descendant which were sent to her family in the United States from Donhof during the 1930's and 1940's.

    I have census records, some immigration records for Colorado, and some church records for Donhof and Windsor, Colorado including birth, death, and marriage records, as well as confirmation records for St. John's church in Windsor.  I also have some church records for German-Russian families in Sterling, Colorado, most of whom came from villages other than Donhof.

    Karen Kaiser
    Co-cordinator for Donhof

    2010 Village Report 

    I have had 40 requests for Dönhof this year all of which I was able to answer from information in my database.  I am currently holding the latest one and the only international request for this year.  It is totally in Russian.  Since I cannot read or speak Russian I have had to run it through an online translation service to find out what was being requested.  I will send the woman an answer although I don't have any information on her immediate family.

    I continue to add to my database and it now contains over 16,000 individuals.

    Dick Leffler

    Village Coordinator for Dönhof

     

  • Dreispitz, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report  

    Dreispitz researchers continue to be busy.  Numerous inquiries were received from researchers in the United States, Germany, Canada, and Argentina.  I have been able to assist and furnish information or refer them to someone else.  It becomes very interesting when you don't speak and write the same language.
     
    There has been a lot of information available from Russia this year.   I have purchased census records for several villages.  I now have censuses for available years for Dobrinka, Dreizpitz, Eckheim, (parcel) Holstein,   (parcel) Hussbenbach, Muller, Rosenberg, Semenovka, Stephan, Strassburg, and Weimar.  I also purchased the three books of The Volga Flows Forever, the reports of Ivan Kulberg, and the oldest (1778) Volga Colony Map.
     
    I have agreed to help the Minhk Book Project by paying for the translation of the village of Dreispitz.
     
    The following surnames are in the Dreispitz Census:  Bai, Bast,  Beisel, Bertram, Busch, Dick, Diel, Dietz, Dutsdcent, Eirig, Feil, Fritzler, Galliard, Gossmann, Hefele, Heidt, Heinitz, Heinze, Hergel, Karg, Keller, Klein,  Kohlberg, Langhofer, Lieders, Lundgrun, Meier, Muller, Quindt, Rupp, Rutz, Schira, Schmidt, Schmies, Schriok, Schulz, Schwemmer, Sinner, Sokolowski,  Steinert, Steinle, Vogel, and Vollert.  Each household ranges from one to fourteen families.  The movement colonies are:  Dinkel, Dobrinka, Grimm, Holstein, Katharinenstadt, Rosenberg, Sarepta, Stephan, Stahl am Karaman, and Stahl am Tarlyk.
     
    I have encouraged and furnished information to relatives, both old and new, in preparing their family histories.  Darrell Kraft, Marysville, Calif., a great-grandson of Gottfried, Sr., and Mary Steinle Meier, is preparing the history for the Kraft family.  Janis Meier Jackson, Reno, Nevada, a granddaughter of Gottfried, Jr. and Anna Klein Meier, has updated and made corrections in that family.  Mary Ann Steinle Bartholomew, Bisbee, Arizona, the great-great-granddaughter of Henry and Sabina Heinze Steinle, is updating her grandmother, Anna Elizabeth Heffel Steinle’s family.  Mary Ann wrote Sabina's  Dream and also Emil's Escape.  Marian Heinze Wold (a new-found cousin), daughter of David and Lydia Miller Heinze, lives in Denver, Colorado.  She is researching her grandparents Reinhart and Amelia Wassenmiller Heinze.  She had letters in the old German Script.  I sent her copies of the German 
    Script writing, and she has transcribed the letters.  Pamela Jo Steinle, Smith Center, Kansas and her parents Darwin S. and Mary Jane Major Steinle, Dorrance, Kansas (new found cousins), are researching Steinle, Major and Beisel.  They came to my home, and we exchanged documents and pictures. 
    Another cousin, Myra Jane Long, daughter of Bernard and Esther Steinle Foran, Ellsworth, Kansas, has prepared a very attractive history of the Steinle and Schwemmer families, and is continuing further research.
     
    I have given Gift Memberships to AHSGR for the year 2011 for my granddaughter, Denise Lyne Kalmer, Chandler, AZ, and for a first cousin twice removed, Becki Heinze Jolly, Richardson, Texas.    I have furnished them with CD's of my Family Tree Maker and other files.   They will help to maintain
    the Heinze Family History and the Steinle Family History.

     

    I attended the International Convention of the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia in Lincoln, Nebraska in August, 2010.  I did research, attended meetings and prepared a display board for the Village of Dreispitz.  Village night for the Lower Volga Colonies had a good attendance.  We were fortunate to have our own room, and we had to bring in extra chairs.  Everyone exchanged information and pictures.  Village Coordinators, Ed Hoak, Janet Flickinger, Edith Bottsford, and Rachel Smith were present.
     
    I attended the AHSGR Roundup of Kansas Chapters in Hays, Kansas, on October 23, 2010.  There was an attendance of 94.  The speakers were Brent Mai of Beaverton, Oregon - "Center for Volga German Studies", and Leona (Wasinger) Pfeifer, Hays, Kansas - "Massacre in Herzog, Russia".  I was  surprised
    with the presentation of an Award "With Appreciation and Thanks" by  the Kansas Chapters of AHSGR, for serving the Golden Wheat Chapter, the Kansas Roundup and the International Society with great diligence and devotion.   It is a great honor to be nominated for this award.
     
     Obituaries are still being collected and prepared for the Lower Volga Obituary Project and for SOAR.  Approximately 1,000 obituaries were submitted in 2010.  I have now collected approximately another 1,000 obituaries which will be submitted to the projects the end of year 2010 or in 2011.  I collect the obituaries online, and have helpers collecting from newspapers in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Nebraska, and from those who want their families on record.  This project has helped many researchers.
     
    I continue to be active in our local AHSGR Golden Wheat Chapter. Besides being the Registrar, I work in the Chapter Library.  I also volunteer a half day each month at the Midwest Genealogy Society library.
     
    At the present time, I am working on the ancestors of the Peter Schneider family from Muller and Eckheim.  Also, I am still working on the Heinze Roots, which is my priority.    However, I am still researching the Steinle family, and welcome any information. 

    Mark B. Wills, Lenexa, Kansas, has agreed to be a Village Coordinator for Dreispitz.  We have been working together for several years and will continue to work together. Mark is a lifetime member of AHSGR, starting research on his ancestors when he was in high school.  His families also resided
    in the villages of Frank and Walter and several  other villages. 
     
    Rachel E. Smith
    Village Coordinator for Dreispitz
    and Chairman of the Lower Volga Obituary Project

     

  • Eckheim, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report

     
    Eckheim, Russian name Ekgeym, was a German colony in the district Eruslan, volost (small administrative peasant division) of Lower Eruslanskoy parish, in Novouensk, Samara province.  It is 560 verst (about 371 miles) from Samara and 112 Verst (about 74 miles) from Saratov.  The distance to the nearest railway station is in Fridenfeld, 13 miles away.

    It was populated by German colonists, Lutherans  It had a prayer house, school, regional office, two court agencies, and four institutions of charity.  It had one steam and three regular windmills.

    Eckheim was a daughter colony founded in 1855 from the colonies of Galka, Müller, Kraft, Mühlberg, Schwab, Lower Dobrinka, Holstein, Frantsozen, and Grimm.  The colony was settled between the years 1855-1867.  It is believed, however, that some settlers came as early as 1852.  After 1915 it was renamed Skatovka.

    Eckheim (Ekgeym) belonged to the district Eruslanskomu Novouzensk county.  The 1857 census showed there were 406 individuals.  According to the Samara Regional Committee, in 1910, there were 238 households with a population of about 2,321.

    I purchased the 1857 census from Brent Mai, and according to it, was able to retrieve the following surnames which I sent to headquarters in Lincoln to add to the Eckheim Village information: Bauer, Beck, Becker, Beitz, Berkel, Borger, Brauer, Brestel, Busch, Decker, Dies, Dumler, Eberhardt, Eiring, Elsasser, Faust, Felde, Gantz, Göbel, Grentz, Hardt, Heide, Heinitz, Herdt, Hess, Hildermann, Hofmann, Hunnergardt, Iskam, Jauck, Jung, Karg, Karst, Keil, Kerbs,Kiesner, Knaus, Knoll, Koch, Kölln, Kraus,Kretz, Kritzfeld, Kuxhaus, Laumann, Leymann,Lohmann, Mai, Maier, Mehler, Meininger, Melzer, Meng, Mühlberger, Nuss, Reichenborn, Rielke, Riffel ,Schäfer, Schmidt, Schneider, Schreiner, Spengler, Spielmann, Sprangel, Steinert, Vogler, Wassenmüller, Weibert, Winick, Winter, Wittmann, Ziesch, and Zwetzig.  There is no known census between 1857 and 1910.

    I purchased the 1820-1923 Lutheran Birth and Marriage Extracts from Bill Pickelhaupt, and found several Eckheim names, although they are listed as being from other villages.  These may be people who married in their home colony, but actually lived in Eckheim.  Further research is needed in this matter.

    I was unable to attend the 2010 convention in Lincoln, but I sent a binder that I have started of Eckheim families.  It is a work in progress.

    There was more activity for Eckheim this year than in the past.  With the able help from Tanja Schell, Munich, Germany, I was able to learn a great deal more about Eckheim and the Eruslan River area.  She informed me of the website: DIE GESCHICHTE DER WOLGADEUTSCHEN, from which I learned a great deal, and was able to download some pictures of Eckheim and the Eruslan River. I am in the process of printing these out, and plan to place them in the binder.

    Michael Frank was helping me set up a web site, but it hit a road block when ill health took over my life for a while. I hope we can resume that process next year.

    I had inquiries from Germany for the surnames Mühlberger and Nuss.  I also heard from local members searching surnames Jauck/Yauck, Heide, and Karst.  I was able to help some people with other colony look-ups, which I enjoy doing and was also able to help a member in Argentina.

    I have downloaded the translations of letters from Eckheim which were provided by Hugh Lichtenwald, and they will be added to the binder.

    Little by little, I am finding more information.  It has become an all consuming and enjoyable journey.

    Suzanne Heinitz-Dodge
    Village Coordinator for Eckheim & Mueller

     

  • Eigenfeld, North Caucasus

     
  • Eigenheim, Akkerman, Bessarabia

 

  • Enders, Samara, Volga
    2010 Village Report

    The Village of Enders has had several requests for information this year from both the United States and Germany.   New information is being added to the slowly growing Enders database, as time permits.  I recently joined Ancestry.com and have begun to compile data from Enders descendants and to locate Enders immigrants in U.S. census records.   

    The Enders website, freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~Enders, is updated periodically with research materials and contributions of ancestral photographs.  I’ve also started an Enders Facebook page where I’ve posted village photos shared by Schneider descendant Cathryn Reed, and ancestral photos as they’re received.

    My emphasis for the coming convention in Salt Lake City will be to find EWZ records for Enders residents who were victims of the soviet oppression.

    Beth Mueller-Rohn Davenport

    Village Coordinator for Enders

 

 

  • Friedensdorf

     

  • Friedrichsfeld, North Caucasus

 

  • Frank-Kolb Village Database, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report  

    During 2010, I established a Facebook page for the Frank-Kolb database.  We currently have 225 fans.  This has proven to be an excellent way to locate and communicate with Frank and Kolb descendants.  The overseas GR community, especially the South American GRs, are very active on Facebook.  The members of the group have shared their family photos and photos of their trips to Frank, along with asking and answering research questions.  Several people who first contacted me via the Facebook page later joined AHSGR. 

    In addition to people finding us via Facebook, we receive queries via e-mail from people who find our e-mail addresses on the AHSGR web site.  Clarence Kissler maintains a web page for Frank, and Gene Jenkins maintains the RootsWeb mailing list for Frank, both of which generate queries on a regular
    basis.  I continue to send out letters to new members listed in the AHSGR newsletter who report Frank or Kolb as their ancestral villages. 

    After my second full year of assisting Doris with Frank Village Coordinator duties, we have
    arrived at a division of labor that has worked out quite well.  All of the research requests initially come to me.  I gather as much information as I can about what the person already knows about their family and review what we already have in the database.  In some cases, someone in their extended family has already submitted data and it is a simple matter of generating the person's ancestor reports.  In most cases some work is involved in identifying their ancestors in the database and connecting the various lines of their family.  I send all of the information I have gathered to Doris, who reviews my work and enters the new information in the database.  Doris is also entering all of the church and other records as we get them organized and translated. 

    A review of my e-mail archive for the last year indicates that I have received research requests from 72 Frank and Kolb descendants since my last report.  This number does not include other Village Coordinators who have asked me to do Frank lookups for them and does not include all of the people
    for whom I ran reports in person at the 2010 AHSGR convention.  Most of the requests come from the United States, though I am receiving more and more requests from Germany, and occasional requests from South America.  My limited German language skills have gotten a real workout over the last year. 

    I sometimes exchange a dozen or more e-mails with someone in the process of answering a query, resulting in roughly a thousand e-mails in my Village Coordinator files for the last year.  Once I identify how the person's family fits into the database, I can usually generate a complete ancestor chart for them, including several generations back into Germany.  I have experimented with using the German language version of PAF in order to generate reports for the German language speakers and that has worked out well so far. We have a large collection of surname charts prepared by Dr. Pleve and we now have most of the church records from 1839 through 1910.  There are a few uncommon surnames that have not been well researched, but for the most part I am able to eventually solve most people's research questions.  

    The main source of frustration that I encounter in answering queries is trying to help people whose ancestors were born in daughter colonies.  There were a number of colonists who left Frank and nearby villages to go to the North Caucasus in the 1830s and 1840s.  There are, to my knowledge, no church or census records that have been located for these North Caucasus towns.  In addition, a number of Volga daughter colonies were formed with colonists from Frank and nearby villages.  Brent Mai has translated the 1857 censuses for Hoffental, Langenfeld, Neu-Yagodnaya, and Neu-Hussenbach, so now we have established which families went to these villages.  Unfortunately, there is limited information available for most of these towns after the 1857 census.  In most cases, this leaves me with only being able to tell someone that their ancestors likely came from Frank and that I can't make any other definite connections. 

    Most people are looking for help with genealogy research.  I receive a few queries every year from people who are seeking living relatives in the United States.  These kinds of queries are difficult because from a privacy standpoint, we don't share any information that we have about living people unless we can get in touch with those people and get permission.  I did succeed in making one connection this year between an individual in Argentina and his relatives here in the US.

     I never cease to be amazed at how forthcoming people are with information.  I receive copies of photos, vital records, obituaries, parochial certificates, and entire family charts.  We save digital copies of everything so that we have documentation of who provided what information.  We also link the images to the database so that we can easily see if we have photos or documents for a particular family.  The image files now approach 6,000 items totaling almost 3GB in size.   The genealogy database itself, in
    PAF, currently contains 220,000 individuals who lived in Frank, their ancestors, spouses and descendants.

    Thank you to Dick Kraus for translating a paper by Ella Gieg entitled "Neue Erkenntnisse zur Auswanderung nach Russland 1766".  This paper describes the German origins of various families who emigrated to the Volga from the Odenwald region of Germany.  In modern Germany, this area is on the border of southern Hesse and northern Baden-Württemberg.  The paper included German origin information for a number of Frank families, and has given us quite a lot of information from which to study and follow up.

    The Ella Gieg paper alerted me to the fact that numerous Frank families appear in the published transport lists (Brent Mai's Transport of the Volga German Colonists).  I was able to locate about half of the families who settled in Frank on these lists.  The Frank families appear primarily on the 4th and 9th transport lists. 

    Igor Pleve's long-awaited Lists of Colonists to Russia in 1766 – Ivan Kuhlberg Reports arrived in our mailboxes a week before the 2010 AHSGR convention.  Initially, I was able to find only about half of the Frank families in the book.  Eventually, I did start to see a pattern emerge. Almost all of the first 31 families on the FSL arrived on two ships, on May 30 and 31, 1766.  Almost all of the next 22 families in the FSL arrived on September 15, 1766.  The remaining 64 families are scattered across a number
    of ships that arrived throughout the summer and fall of 1766, with most of them arriving on September 14, 1766.  The interesting thing about the September 14th arrival is that there are 24 families from the same town in Germany - Gersfeld - all on the same ship and primarily going to Frank.

    Now that I have the Kulberg Lists, the Transport Lists, and the First Settler's lists together, I am thinking that Frank may have been settled in two stages.  The first group would have been the individuals who arrived in Oranienbaum on May 30 and 31 of 1766 and are listed as the first 31 families in the FSL.  None of them appear in the published transport lists.  The second group would have been the individuals who arrived in Oranienbaum primarily on September 14 and 15 of 1766.  Many of these individuals appear
    on the published transport lists. I suspect that the available transport lists reflect the transports of the colonists who arrived later in 1766.  I would be interested to hear if anyone has seen any patterns in their village data that would confirm this. 

     The Volgograd church records are a work in progress.  The long term goal is to have them all translated and indexed.  In the short term, I have to page through them to locate a birth or marriage if I am missing information for a query.  This can be tedious if I don't have an exact birth or marriage date. The quantity of data is overwhelming.  There are more than 3,000 pages of church records.  The number of records on each page varies, but my rough guess is that there are more than 40,000 records to be translated, indexed, and eventually made available in some way. 

     Another interesting item that came to my attention this year is data that appears on the website of The Ministry of Internal Affairs for the Tyumen Region.  The Ministry has started posting a listing of "Special Settlers" who have been "rehabilitated".  The list includes not only Germans, but others who were repressed during Soviet times.  It is apparently not a comprehensive list, but a list of only those families who have requested that they, or their ancestor, be "rehabilitated".  The list now includes the first three letters of the Russian alphabet and part of the fourth.  I was alerted to the existence of these lists by one of my cousins who lives in Tyumen.  Thank you to Tanja Schell for helping me make this family connection. 

    Prepared by Maggie Hein and submitted on behalf of the

    Frank Village Coordinators, Doris Evans and Maggie Hein

     

  • Frankreich, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report

     

    Frankreich was founded in 1861 by Lutheran colonists resettling from Galka, Shcherbakovka, and Schwab.  Surnames for Frankreich include Ehrlich, Eichmann, Geier, Lattner, Lorenz, Messerschmidt, Reich, Schmidt, Schwab, Wunsch, and Ziegler.  The source list of these village surnames was the 1857 census from Brent Mai received in the early part of 2010.

     

    Villages in the Lower Volga region were given a fixed amount of land, as described in the history section.  Land was divided, and re-divided periodically, among the households and families in the village.  By the time of the 1850’s, the amount of land for each family was so small that families could not grow enough crops to both use as food and sell for income.

     

    The solution was to found new villages, called daughter colonies, in parts of the Lower Volga region where no villages existed.  Most of these villages were on the east side of the Volga River.

     

    Leland Riffel

    Village Coordinator for Frankreich, Neu-Galka, Strassburg, Neu-Weimar, Alt-Weimar, & Weimar

  • Galka, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report

    Thanks to contributions by a number of people researching their ancestors from Galka, in August 2009 I was able to place an order for copies of all available church records for Galka. The original records are located at the Russian Archives in Volgograd.  Part of the records were received in May 2010, and the remainder in August 2010.  The records include the following:  birth records for 1863-1884 and 1901-1902 (500 pages with 6-10 births per page), deaths during 1904, and marriages for 1894, 1895, and 1905.  

     Extraction of the birth records is ongoing.  Birthdates, birth record number, and baptism date (if the month is different than the birth date) are added to the Galka database. The birth record number is recorded so that the original record can be easily found in case people want a copy of the original church record.  Births were not recorded in chronological order of birth, but when the birth was reported to the Lutheran pastor.   Some births, in later years, were recorded as much as one year after the birth.  Parents are matched with information already in the database.  If a mother’s information can be matched with a record already in the database, a family group sheet for the mother is printed in PDF format, along with a family group sheet for the father.  These family group sheets are uploaded to
    another web site that I maintain, which has a password protected folder for Galka, along with individual folders for each surname in the village. Because of the large amount of storage required for this part of the project for both Dobrinka and Galka, I was able to find a bargain on web site hosting with BlueHost.com, which provides me with unlimited online storage for $60 per year.  PDF files are named by the full name of the father (or mother) along with birth year and FGS in the name.  Individual detail
    reports (Master Genealogist report) are also printed for people who immigrated to the US, Canada or Argentina and additional details about the family are known.

    Galka was limited in the amount of good farmland available to the people in the village, and by about 1861 had 13 daughter colonies (Neu-Galka, Alt-Weimar, Neu-Weimar, Eckheim, Erlenbach, Oberdorf, Blumenfeld, Frankreich, Friedenburg, Gnadentau, Morgantau, Rosenberg and Wisenmuller),
    with translated 1857 census being available for all but Oberdorf and Blumenfeld.  The Blumenfeld census is currently being translated by Brent Mai, and will probably be available in 2011.  These censuses help greatly in determining parents of children born in the 1863 to 1884 time period.  The Galka Lutheran Parish consisted of the churches in the villages of Galka, Dobrinka, Dreispitz and Holstein.

    I continue to maintain a web site for Galka information at: http://www.galkagr.org/.   The web site includes three histories of the village, including the history written by A. N. Mink, and found in the
    Historical and Geographical Dictionary of the Saratov Province (Saratov, Russia, 1898).  A list of surnames of people who lived at Galka is available, and a list of people researching their ancestors from Galka, which shows surnames they are researching and the researchers email address. There is a report from a visit to Galka in 2001 and 2009.

     Several dozen inquiries were received involving people from Galka.  The inquiries were from people in the US, Canada, Argentina, Germany and Russia.  The inquiries from Germany and Russia usually result in connecting people in the Galka database, although it usually takes a number of emails trying to determine the oldest people that the descendant knows about from the village.  The Galka database has 8,000+ people, with another 3,500 expected when the extraction of the Galka birth records is complete.

    Gary Martens
    Village Coordinator for Galka

     
  • Glückstal Colonies Research Association

    2010 Village Report for GCRA - Glueckstal Colonies

    Several years ago Margaret Freeman had asked me to begin taking over some of the administrative duties of GCRA.  As most of you know, Margaret was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in early October of 2009. At that point I took over all responsibilities for the coordination and administration of
    GCRA, although Margaret continued to remain involved into August of 2010.

    Earlier, in summer 2009, a complete set of photocopies and digital copies of original documents from Ukrainian archives was shipped to my home, while a second copy remains in the possession of another member of the GCRA Steering Committee.

    In early 2010, the GCRA Steering Committee made the decision to transfer most of the GCRA files and library to the Germans from Russia Heritage Collection (GRHC) at North Dakota State University in Fargo. The GCRA collection at the home of Margaret & Bob Freeman consisted of 20 file drawers of materials, plus a library of books and other materials. Office files and some library materials were to be shipped to my home in Richmond, VA.

    I spent the first week of May 2010 at the home of Margaret & Bob Freeman in Redondo Beach, California, sorting and packing materials with the help of Bob Freeman and local volunteers.  Margaret was involved in the process by looking through files and other materials, and providing advice regarding
    the disposition of the contents.

    The next week more than 1300 pounds of books, files, etc. were shipped to GRHC & more than 300 pounds to my home. I subsequently spent a total of 25 days working with the collection at GRHC (in June, July-August, and September-October).  Local volunteers helped purge the files of material of no value to researchers.  Most of it related to membership renewals.  We began the project with 31 plastic totes of files.  This was reduced to 20 totes. I compiled an alphabetical list of the files, and used an indexing system to help identify the contents. The book collection was catalogued by the cataloging department of the NDSU main library.

    Some additional material was shipped from GRHC to Richmond & vice-versa.  Information on the GCRA Archives at GRHC can be found at the website: http://library.ndsu.edu/grhc/research/genealogy/gcra/index.html.

    The GCRA Steering Committee also made the decision to establish the "Margaret (Aman) and Robert Freeman Publication Fund" of GCRA, in recognition of the significant contributions of these two individuals to the founding, operation and promotion of GCRA since 1987. The Fund is hosted by GRHC, and information on the Fund can be found at the website: http://library.ndsu.edu/grhc/aboutus/files/gcra.pdf

    Meanwhile, I have been working on organizing the GCRA office files, books, and other information at my home.  In addition, a volunteer member is working on establishing an "organizational" page on Facebook for GCRA.

    GCRA continues to publish two Newsletters yearly, and I have been responsible for the last three issues. GCRA continues to have about 400 members.

    Homer Rudolf

    Coordinator for GCRA

    Village Coordinator for the Glueckstal Colonies

     

  • Gnadenfeld, (Neu-Moor/Moor), Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report

    Gnadenfeld, (Russian name Kirovskoye), was a small "daughter" colony located in Samara Province, on the Weisenseite (meadow side) of the Volga, District of Krasny-Kut.

    Due to family illness and my eye problem I have not been able to spend much time on my computer this past year.

    Due to its small population, I do not receive many inquiries, but this past year I have assisted three people researching Gnadenfeld families.

    I referred one person to Walerji Scheck, coordinator of the colony of Gnadenfeld for Volga Germans in Europe.  He was able to help her.

    I assisted several people with research from other colonies.

    I purchased the 1857 census from Brent Mai and finally have a list of families who settled in Gnadenfeld when it was formed in 1855, which will be a great help tracing these families through the 1798, 1775 and 1834 census records, which I have.

    Irma A. Waggoner

    Village Coordinator for Gnadenfeld

     

  • Goebel, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report 

    Goebel is also known as Gebel, Goebel, Göbel, Ust-Gräsnucha, Ust-Grjasnucha, Ust-Grjaznucha,

    Ust-Gryaznukha, Ust-Grasnukha, or Ust-Graesnucha.  It is a Russian Catholic German village situated on the western side of the Volga.

    I took on the duties of the Village Coordinator for Göbel about 15 months ago, around September 2009. I am continuing to add to the village chart of known names, births and marriages.  I am currently using Family Tree Maker software.  I received AHSGR information, files, links, databases and materials in addition to the 1798, 1816/1834 and 1850/1857 census reports I had already obtained from AHSGR, Rosemary Larson and Brent Mai respectively.  I also have a copy of Pleve's Volume II with the FSL for Göbel.

    I had approximately twenty different people contact me this year regarding the village of Göbel and was able to help most folks out with at least some information, even if it was information to confirm that their particular ancestors may not have lived in Göbel.   I was referred contacts by fellow Village Coordinators and also made references to other VC’s.   I also have been sharing information with other VC’s with Göbel -related questions and some common surname contacts, especially among the Roman Catholic villages. Most contacts were from the United States, but I also have been enjoying exchanges with people from Russia and Germany.  Correspondence with one of the contacts from Russia has been particularly rewarding.  I hope to participate in the coming year with fellow village coordinators in obtaining records from the Volgograd Archives.
     
    I am still pursuing the goal of setting up a website established for Göbel village but have not yet been able to find the time to do so.  I hope to make significant progress this year towards finishing the entering all the census information into the village chart in the coming year.  Researching the EWZ records for Göbel records was particularly rewarding as several of the EWZ cards I found included photos and partial family tree information for the early 1900's.

    Ben Markel

    Village Coordinator for Göbel

     

  • Graf, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report for Graf

     

    I have received a few inquiries for the village of Graf, some from Germany, Russia and the United States.  At the local Oktoberfest there was a Windholz reunion and a number of family members came to this reunion from South America.  I was able to meet with them and open a line of communication with the help of other Windholz family members.

    So far I have the following information on the village of Graf:
         Lists of Colonists to Russia in 1766
         Einwanderung in das Wolgagebeit 1764-1767 books
         1798, 1834, and 1850 Censuses
         1878 Family list (bits and pieces)
         1895 Family List
         Birth Records - 1889, 1890, 1894, 1897, 1908, 1911, 1914
         Marriage Records - 1912, 1914
         Death Records - 1890, 1911, 1914
         Plot Map from 1932

    Our local Kansas group continues to obtain many of the LDS records and have them translated for our villages.  Because Hays, Kansas is situated in the melting pot of six Volga-German villages that contain 
    people from the colonies of Obermunjor, Graf, Wittmann, Louis, Mariental, Herzog, Pfeifer, Leibenthal, Zug, Schoenchen, and Neu-Obermunjou my data base contains about 92,000 surnames of descendants 
    from colonies.

    I continue to monitor the magazine, "Volk auf dem Weg" for any new books that may come out pertaining to Unsere Leute.  The last two books I added to my collection are:

         Wo unsere Toten ruhenm liegt unsere Heimat by Nina Paulsen which includes a CD of funeral burial songs
         Von der Wolga uber Sibirien nach Osnabruck - by Johannes Riedel

    Both are very interesting books, but are written in German.

    I also maintain a large obituary collection on file for deaths in Ellis County, Kansas as well as obituary cards from the area.

    In 2011 I plan to start making copies of everything that I have and sending it to Lincoln as part of my responsibilities as a Village Coordinator.  We have seen too many Village Coordinators who have either died or quit and their material is lost to all researchers.

    Kevin Rupp
    Village Coordinator for Graf

 

  • Grimm, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report

    Several changes have been made for the Colony of Grimm this past year.  Ken Leffler remains the Village Coordinator.   John Groh and Henry Schmick are his assistants.

    We have not been overwhelmed with requests but we were able to assist several domestic and foreign inquiries.  As our database grows, so does our ability to provide assistance.

    We have compiled a list of Grimm surnames taken from the Kulberg List, the First Settlers List, Germans to Denmark to Volga List, census records for 1775, 1798, 1816, 1834, 1850, 1857, the partial 1897 Revision List, and the 1889 Grimm Heads of Family Meeting List.

    We have compiled a list of 29 individuals researching Grimm surnames.

    The Grimm web page continues and we are trying to figure out how to use Facebook.

    We had a display at the Convention this past summer but only 2 people registered.  Village Night was a disaster.  No one could find the Grimm area, including us.

    We remain optimistic and encourage researchers to contact us.

    Ken Leffler
    Village Coordinator for Grimm

    Assistants:
         John Groh
         Henry Schmick

 

  • Güldendorf, Grossliebental, Odessa, Kherson
     

 

  • 2010 Village Report for Herzog

    The year 2010 was a very exciting one for the village of Herzog.  I was able to make contact with two descendants of Herzog living in Germany and one living in Argentina along with countless people in the United States.  This year we also began translating baptismal, death and marriage records for Herzog and surrounding villages.  These documents are available on microfilm from the LDS library in Salt Lake City and are written in Russian Cyrillic script.

     

    With the help of many volunteers, we have been able to begin getting these records translated.  I've been trying to teach myself to read it as well.  In addition, I have also put together a comprehensive listing of the families of Herzog following family lines from census to census beginning in 1767 through
    1857.  A master copy has been placed in the village file at Lincoln.  There is still regular traffic on the Herzog Facebook page and I continue to get more people asking to join the group.

     

    Another exciting thing happened at our Kansas Round Up this fall.  Leona Pfeifer made available to the public a hand-drawn map of Herzog, Russia listing the inhabitants of Herzog in 1920 and including the location of the mass grave following the massacre there.


    I am looking forward to 2011 as I hope to compile the information from the church records being translated from the microfilm.


    Jerry Braun

    Village Coordinator for Herzog

 

  • Hoffnungstal, Akkerman, Bessarabia
     

     

  • Holstein, Saratov, Volga
     

     

  • Huck, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report

    Huck, Saratov, Volga

    2010 was a very good year in terms of the amount of correspondence with persons interested in the village.  In addition to messages from persons in the United States, I received four inquiries from persons in Germany, two from Russia, but none this year from Argentina.  I fear the lack of interest from
    Argentina this year may be due to researchers in Argentina now aware of the absence of Huck records from 1858 to 1888.  Without that I have limited resources to share except for contacts of Huck researchers interested in the same surname.  I received inquiries about the following surnames: Brotzman, Huck, Michael, Stohl, Haas, Kindsvater, Blehm, Morkel, Schwabauer, Sittner, Leichner, Voelcker, and Lofing/Lofink.  Having the village census records from 1775 through 1857 plus the list of Huck village researchers made it (relatively) easy to field the questions.

    On-line translation support only goes so far. One of the Russian inquiries stumped a Russian-English translation tool until I chose Ukrainian-English and that was only partially successful.

    This year was unusual because most of the American correspondents were willing to share information they had about their family in exchange for what I was able to provide. I don't know about the rest of the coordinators but I've become accustomed to the sharing of data too often be a one way exercise. In
    addition to being able to help many of the correspondents with information I also learned of two more 'distant' cousins because of commonality of our family linkages after we examined the exchanged data.

    Experienced coordinators are well aware of the importance of documenting the source of information we obtain or receive about a surname or a village. I wish someone had counseled me about that when I began collecting my own family history in 1976. I've painfully learned that lesson as I work through
    the letters and paper records I have as I update my own history documentation. For any new coordinators or any researcher reading this report, I can't emphasize enough the importance of documenting where you obtained those factoids - and a shoebox filled with letters and note cards
    isn't the answer.

    One last item…I recently learned about the history of a Huck family from one Family History pamphlet in the AHSGR library. I had completely forgotten about those as a possible source of information about Huck families. There are several hundred of those histories in the library and I plan to spend some time examining those for surnames that have a Huck history the next time I'm in Lincoln. The last copy of the Family History List (FHL) I have is from 2006. We (coordinators) were supposed to be sent copies of the FHL and the Annotated Bibliography yearly but it appears the FHL fell off the earlier instructions.  I've requested (and it will happen) that we all be sent a copy of the most recent version of both.

    Dennis Zitterkopf
    Village Coordinator for Huck

     

  • Husaren, Saratov, Volga
     

     

  • Hussenbach, Linevo Ozero, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report for Hussenbach (Linevo Osero)

     

    For the past year, I have been diligently translating the records I received from the Volgograd archives through Doris Evans.  I have completed the rough translation of the births, deaths and marriages for the years 1818-1839. I have integrated them and the 1834 Census into the Hussenbach database.  Currently I am not inputting the 1857 Census into the database. The database now contains 16,800 people.

     

    I was lucky to spend some time at Concordia University.  I met with Brent Mai, Shirley Hurrel and Michael Frank at the Center for Volga German Studies, to do research and to exchange information between our villages.  Then Brent helped me move my daughter, Erin, into her dorm room as she is now attending Concordia University.

     

    I had exchanges with several other coordinators including Hugh Lichtenwald of Dönhof, Gary Martens of Dobrinka, Doris Evans and Maggie Hein of Frank, Kelly Horst of Kolb, Michael Frank of Kautz, Mary Mills and Michael Fyler of Walter.

     

    A special thank you goes to David Schmidt, Brent Mai, Arthur Flegel and others on the List-serves for answering all my questions.

     

    I set up a Facebook page for Hussenbach (Linevo Osero) and Neu-Hussenbach (Gaschon).  It has 50 members and 14 photos have been added to the page.  I have made contact with people from the United States, Canada, Argentina, Germany and Russia via the Facebook page.

     

    I have received about 220 emails concerning Hussenbach including 11 inquiries which came from the Hussenbach Facebook page, 3 from MyHeritage.com where I have posted my direct family line, and a few more referenced from my Hussenbach webpage to my e-mail.  I have received inquiries from Argentina, Germany, Russia, and Canada.  I was able to help some of them.  For others we are waiting on more data to bridge the gap between the 1857 Census and the immigration in the late 19th Century to the United States and/or other destinations.

     

     Sources available for Hussenbach Research:

    German Migration to the Russian Volga (1764-1767): Origins and Destinations, by Brent Mai and Dona Reeves-Marquardt.  I found 4 marriages and 1 birth for future residents of Hussenbach.

    Lists of Colonists to Russia in 1766 – Ivan Kuhlberg Reports, by Igor Pleve.  I found 103 family names and 412 individuals, a descendant of which resides at some point in Hussenbach, either immigrating directly to Hussenbach, marrying into the village or moving to Hussenbach at some point.

    Transport of the Volga Germans from Oranienbaum to the Colonies on the Volga 1766-1767, by Brent Mai.  I have found 47 family names and 165 individuals, which have a Hussenbach connection at some point.

    1798 Census of the German Colonies along the Volga, by Brent Mai.  Surnames:  about 220.  I have found 188 family names and 949 individuals listed for the village of Hussenbach.  Many of the new family names married into the village from other villages.

    1834 Census of Hussenbach in the District of Saratov, Russia, translated by Brent Mai.

    It lists 2,301 people and 105 surnames.

    1857 Census of Hussenbach in the District of Saratov, Russia, translated by Brent Mai.

    There are 100 surnames listed. I am in the process of entering them in the database.

     

     

    Records found in the Volgograd Archives:

    Births:  1818-1838, (Rough translation completed), 1839-1876, 1877-1887, 1888-1895, 1896-1899, 1902-1904, 1906-1909,

    Marriages:  1818-1838, (Rough translation completed), 1902-1908

    Deaths:  1818-1838, (Rough translation completed), 1839-1858, 1862-1881, 1882-1890, 1891-1895, and 1900-1908.

    Surname Charts:  I have accessed 51 different Surname Charts, which have a connection to Hussenbach, either from the Collection of Louise Potter or through the SOAR database.

    Hussenbach Review:  June 1994-March 1999, printed 4 times a year.  S, S, F, W.

     

     Hussenbachers are known to have moved to these daughter colonies: Neu-Hussenbach, Aehrenfeld, Langenfeld, and Neu Bauer.

     

     I still have many sources to go through so the Hussenbach database will continue to grow and I hope to make many more connections for people in the future.

     

    Susan Nakaji

    Village Coordinator for Hussenbach

     

  • 2010 Village Report for Johannestal

    I only received two queries relating to Johannestal this year.  I updated the website once this year but not much new information has been forthcoming.  I did just receive a book entitled "From Johannestal with Love" by Olga Fromm, Valya and Milt Kramer.  I am planning to check to see if the authors have sent the AHSGR a copy.

    I continue with my index efforts of the 1930's era communist repression records.

    Ray Heinle
    Village Coordinator for Johannestal, Beresan, Odessa

     

  • Josefstal / Schwabe Khutor, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report for Josefstal

     

    There were not many requests for information on Josefstal.  The publication of our book on Josefstal has generated some interest in Germany, where it was published.  My cousin is hearing from various folks born in Josefstal and/or who have relatives from there.  Some new stories about life in the village have come our way, so my cousin is already considering publishing another edition.  I'm hopeful we can get it translated into English.

    Work and research for the web site continues... http://www.josefstal.org

    Even if there is no great demand, it continues to be a labor of love and dedication to the people of this village.

    With the release of some of the Bremen passenger lists, I was able to document the departure of over 200 Josefstal residents in 1908!  It was quite a find and when you are looking at a village of 1400 or so inhabitants, it must have had quite an impact on the village.

    Edward (Ted) Gerk
    Village Coordinator for Josefstal

     

  • Jost, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report for Jost

     

    The Village of Jost has had several requests for information this year from both the U.S. and Germany.   New information is being added to the growing Jost database, as time permits.  I recently joined Ancestry.com and have begun to compile data from Jost descendants and to locate Jost immigrants in U.S. census records.

     

    The Jost website,  freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jost, is updated periodically with research materials and contributions of ancestral photographs.  I’ve also started a Jost Facebook page where I’ve posted village photos shared by Dodie Rotherham, and ancestral photos as they’re received.

    Sharon White has contributed some intriguing EWZ records for Jost residents who were victims of the Soviet oppression.  Locating more of these records will be my emphasis next year in Salt Lake City.

     

    Beth Mueller-Rohn Davenport

    Village Coordinator for Jost

     

  • 2010 Village Report for Kamenka

    There have been a number of inquiries from researchers in the United States.  Some come from South America (Argentina and Brazil) and a number come from Germany.  The number from Russia is increasing as they find out about the AHSGR Village Coordinators.  Recently I received an inquiry from Kazakhstan.

    This year I would like to give an example of research that I have found quite fascinating.  In the FSL of Kamenka, a LUDWIG DERLIGION is listed as the stepfather of the WIESNER clan [my ancestry].  The Kamenka FSL states that Ludwig was from Falkenburg and Catholic. Prior to arriving in Kamenka in 1766, Ludwig came from Scheswig-Holstein, listed as Lutheran, and was known as JOHANN LUDWIG TERILLON.

    He was married to Anna Maria Theresa prior to his journey from Durlach, Baden arriving in Scheswig-Holstein in 1763, which at the time was under Danish rule.  They had four children:  Johann Adam, Michael, Anna Maria, and Christina Caroline.  Ludwig's wife died in Gottorf, Schleswig-Holstein.

    Johann Adam appeared only in the Kamenka FSL and the 1775 Kamenka census. Michael married Maria Katarina Winshu as noted in the various revision lists.

    Anna Maria's baptism was found in familysearch.org in Hohenwettersbach, Durlach, Baden.  This record shows the parents of Anna Maria Terillon as JEAN LOUIS TERILLON [French for Johann Ludwig] and Anna Maria Werschen in the Lutheran church in  Hohenwettersbach.  The mother, Anna Maria, is listed as Catholic in these records… Anna Maria Terillon married Georg Heimling.  Christina Caroline was born and died in Gottorf, Schleswig-Holstein before the journey to the Volga in 1765 at the invitation of Catherine the Great.

     It was suggested that since Jean Louis [Johann Ludwig] is French, his birthplace is likely Falquemont, [French for Falkenburg] located in Lorraine, France.

    The reason for the moves:  Very poor working conditions in the Durlach, Baden area.  The work and living conditions were very, very harsh in the Schleswig-Holstein area.  Our ancestors were all looking for better living conditions thus the trek to Russia.

    Respectfully submitted,

    Rosemary Wiesner Larson
    Village Coordinator for Kamenka

     

  • Katharinenstadt, Samara, Volga

  • 2010 Village Report

     

    This year we have had several requests from around the world.  We have tried to answer all inquires as soon as possible.  Most of the information that people are asking for is from the 1880's to the 1930's.  We are trying to see  what information is out there and will try to get it. If at all possible we would like whatever help anyone can offer.
     
    Raynona & Marvin Bohrer
    Village Coordinators for Katharinenstadt
    Friends of the Engles Archives

     

  • Kassel, Glückstal, Odessa, Kherson

 

  • Kautz, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report
     

    This has been a great year for Kautz research.  I was able to invest in the acquisition of Kautz and Kautz area parish (church) records from the Volgograd Archives through Brent Mai at Concordia University in Portland, Oregon.  The following parish records were made available:

     

                    Births (1835-1849) - 105 pages, 677 records

                    Births (1899-1901) - 64 pages, 321 records

                    Marriages (1835-1901) - 1834 records

                     Deaths (1872-1886) - 678 records

                    Deaths (1887-1910) - 1383 records

                    Deaths (1910-1918) - 351 records

     

    Most of the handwritten records were in German.  However, many were in Russian (Cyrillic) and a smaller number (mainly in the death records) contained both German and Russian names, written exquisitely.  I translated critical names and dates for all these records, compared them to the Kautz genealogy database, and made additions and corrections to the database as needed.  My cousin, Dorothy Brandner, was very helpful in translating causes of death from German to English in the 1872-1886 death records.  Brent, with his busy schedule, has been able to proofread a small number of these translations, so far.

     

    The birth records were the most detailed, with substantial information given on each birth, paragraph style.  I translated only the name, birth date, and parent’s names, enough to build families in the Kautz database.  Maybe in the future, as I find time, I’ll attempt to translate the additional information in those records.

     

    Marriage records, though numerous in quantity, gave only sparse information, namely only a sequence number, marriage date and the names of the couples.  Unfortunately, many people in the village shared common names, so it was more difficult to identify the correct couples against the Kautz database.  Due to the limited number of surnames in the village, and the popularity of certain first and middle names, it would not be uncommon for three or more individuals in the village to have the same name.  For that reason, nicknames were sometimes adopted to additionally differentiate among individuals.  Typically, if the couple was young, children soon followed, and the correct marriage identification could be made against the Kautz database using the church’s birth records, which listed the parents.

     

    Death records contained name, death date, burial date, Krankheit (illness), father, mother, age at death (years/months/days), sex, and status (child, schoolchild, single, married, widowed).  Many pages required a left and right scan because the original was so wide.  From the death date and age at death, I was able to calculate birthdate using a great little online program located at ProGenealogists (http://www.progenealogists.com/birthfromdeath.htm).  I was also able to match many deaths against existing entries in the Kautz database, which now contains 27,572 individuals.  There are still a certain number of records whose translation has eluded me, requiring the additional scrutiny of Brent.  All records are mastered in spreadsheet format which reflect into the Family Treemaker Kautz database.

     

    Causes of death were widely varied.  The most common causes of death (1872-1886) in Kautz, were listed as:  Throat swelling (Diptheria), Tuberculosis (Consumption), Typhoid fever, Smallpox, stillbirths, Scarlet Fever, Rubella (Measles), Infantile seizures, ‘Weakness’, Asthma, Mumps, and Pulmonary weakness.  Many lesser reasons were given for other individuals.  Some years saw rampant disease ravaging the village, especially young children and infants.  The year 1883 was particularly bad with all major diseases taking their toll.  For that year, there were 126 deaths of children.  Six occurred in ages 11-17.  Eight were middle-aged and five were elderly.  That gives you some idea as to one reason why families tended to have many children.  Another reason, more sons in a family meant more land allocated to the family for farming.

     

    The parish records, though a great resource, introduced a lot of data to the Kautz project to be further scrutinized.  The lack of census records after 1857 contributes to the existence of ‘stub’ families after 1857…those families who are detailed but cannot, at this time, link back to previous generations without further analysis.  Acquisition of birth records after 1849 and death records prior to 1872 will help to clarify the relationships.  The parish records varied in quality from poor to extremely fine, depending upon the pastor or scribe.  I plan to acquire additional documents through Brent as funds become available.

     

    From ideas garnered in previous 2010 village reports, I am assembling a list of all those who have contacted me over the years and putting those with common surnames in contact with each other.  It’ll be a chance to reunite with those who have corresponded with me in the past to see if new information can prove useful to us all.

     

    Thanks mainly to Henry Schmick, I have processed at least 31 obituaries, relating to Kautz descendants during the year.  As far as contacts go, I corresponded with 43 individuals regarding Kautz families.  Surnames researched included: Benzel, Frank, Frickel, Fuchs, Gradwohl, Harding, Hardt, Klein, Knaub, Lackmann, Lehr, Michel, Neibauer, Ostermiller, Ostwald, Popp, Reiter and Schreiner.

     

    I was able to attend the convention in Lincoln this year.  My wife and I will attend the convention in Salt Lake City next year.  I would be able to walk to the one in Portland the year after, since I live across the Columbia River in Vancouver, Washington.

     

    I continue as Village Coordinator Reports Editor for 2010.  I try to edit each of the village submissions for punctuation, grammar, and clarity.  Please review your village’s report at the AHSGR website after January 1, 2011.  If additional changes or corrections are needed, please let me know.

     
    D. Michael Frank

    Village Coordinator for Kautz

     
  • Klosterdorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson

     
  • Köhler, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report

    I received two inquiries this past year, one from America and one from Canada. Most of the inquiries would go to Nick and Barb Bretz, since they have a great amount of family information and have done a lot of work obtaining Russian records for this village.

    The person from Canada requesting information on a Macht family was most interesting.  I had been seeking information for a long time on a Magdalena (Ziegler) Macht.  She was one of five siblings who immigrated from Köhler.  Three came to America, one to South America, and Magdalena Macht to Canada.  The person seeking information on the Macht family knew this Magdalena Macht well, since she was his grandmother.  He was willing to share family data and pictures.  One of the pictures was of my grandmother’s brother, Philip Rosenbach who married one of the five siblings, Mary Ziegler.  They would later change their name to Rossbach.

     As far as my current research, I have expanded my work to include families who emigrated from Russia and have connections to Köhler families.  In addition, I am researching Volga German families that settled in places like the Little Russia community of Topeka, Kansas.

    Dave Haspert

    Co-Village Coordinator for Köhler

 

  • Kolb, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report for Kolb 

    I've only had five requests for information so far this year and two of those were follow-up questions from last year.  Thelma Sprenger has also been working on a handful of requests and Maggie Hein has kindly been assisting a researcher from Germany.

    Most of my efforts have been directed at building the joint website for Frank and Kolb which will finally be completed soon, and will expect to stay active by keeping it up to date in the future.

    Kelly Horst

    Village Coordinator for Kolb

    2010 Village Report

    I have not had many requests for information concerning Kolb.  For some I need more than just a name and when I ask for more information they do not write back.  I had about three people for which I did send information.

    Thelma Sprenger

    Village Coordinator for Kolb


     
  • Konstantinovka, Samara, Volga

 

  • Kraft, Saratov, Volga


    2010 Village Report

     
    We had a lot more activity for Kraft this year than last.

    There were about 29 emails, all requesting genealogy support.  I was able to help most
    and learned a few things myself.

    I searched the various online genealogy message boards and added a few names to my list of Kraft researchers.  My main obstacle remains the lack of relative data available for the period
    between 1857 and about 1900.  The marriage and birth records which I have for that period are sporadic and don't really provide enough information to connect the couples to anyone in the 1857 census.

    Ron Burkett
    Village Coordinator for Kraft 

     

  • Krasnojar, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report for Krasnoyar

    There was very limited activity for this village.  I received three queries from Russia. 

    One of the parties sent me a list of the trudarme victims by the name of Aul.  I had the list translated and forwarded a copy along with the party’s email address to an Aul family member who belongs to the Northeast Illinois chapter.

    I have a copy of the settlement list and the 1798 census.

     

    Sue Hess
    Village Coordinator for Krasnoyar

     

     
  • Kratzke, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report for Kratzke
     
    In general, this was a slower year for requests coming from Kratzke researchers.  I didn't keep an exact count, but there were probably no more than one each week on average.  Many are younger researchers which is nice!  Interest clusters around family reunions held mostly during the summer as people become reinvigorated to learn about their ancestors - also around weddings and wedding anniversaries as families gather and discuss the family lore and history.  We had a nice turnout in Lincoln at the AHSGR Convention in August.  About a dozen Kratzke descendants shared information and conversation throughout the convention week.

    As you may recall, Ethel Brack Lock died toward the end of last year (30 Sept. 2009).  She had been the original Kratzke Village Coordinator since the network was established and was active answering questions even during her last months.  I believe that her papers were headed to Lincoln, although I've not heard from her family that they've been sent there.

    Parish records for Kratzke were obtained and have been in translation.  The marriages for 1834-1854 and 1894-1895 have been completed.  Others for baptisms and burials are in process, but moving slowly as my work on translating census documents for other colonies has taken priority.  However, I anticipate that the work on the Kratzke records should be completed in January.

    Translation of the parish records for neighboring Dietel, Kautz, and Merkel have also yielded much information on the families living in Kratzke.  There was much inter-marriage among these four colonies, and they often shared a pastor who seems to have randomly recorded ministerial acts in any one of the four parishes, regardless of in which colony they had occurred.  This makes for interesting research!  I am also personally indebted to the Holstein research group who obtained and translated the available Holstein parish records (roughly 1799-1852).  They have provided much collateral family information for the Mai families who remained there and didn't move to Kratzke - but many of which reconnected in Kansas more than 100 years later.

    We've not yet set up a FaceBook site for Kratzke.  I suppose that I should do that in this coming year!

    Thanks to all who have contributed to and shared information through the Village Coordinator network.  Happy New Year!! 

    Brent Mai
    AHSGR Village Coordinator for Kratzke

     

  • Kronental, North Caucasus

 

  • Kukkus, Samara, Volga

     

    2010 Village Report
     
    The Kukkus Village database contains over 12,000 names now. I added some names from the 1857 census and the 1837 census for Kukkus.  A family presentation was made at the Fresno CDC Heritage Fest in May for family Krum(m).  I included pictures of the village of Wenings, Germany and of the Kukkus village and listed several families who were related to the Krumm family who lived in the Fresno area.  I was able to help a person from my dental office who had Lehmann relatives from Kukkus and was able to link a non-GR relative to his sister's husband's Seibel relatives in Lodi for a Seibel/Reider friend.  I have Reider cousins, but mine are from the Volga and the Lodi folks are from South Russia.

    My research has included some replies to inquiries, but I could not find definite matches.
    I will be sending ancestor information for an inquiry about Kukkushaus/Maser/ Debus.

     

    I was not able to attend convention this year, but hope to attend the one in Salt Lake City.  Right now it is planned, but iffy.  My goal for 2011 is to do much more research and verification of information.

    Best wishes.

     

    Eleanor Sissell
    AHSGR Village Coordinator for Kukkus

     

  • Kulm, Bessarabia

 

  • Lauwe, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report

     

    Things have been very quiet for Lauwe.  I only received two requests for information, one of which was from a fellow who has compiled a fairly large Lauwe family history database and he wanted to know how to sell it.  I tried in vain to convince him to donate the database to AHSGR and to freely share his data with other researchers.  He only had selling it in mind and I got nowhere.

    The Lauwe website is still operational but I have not obtained any additional information to post on it.  The website is of an old, outmoded style but I am unable to make any major updates since the original software that I used to build it has become obsolete.

    Ray Heinle
    Village Coordinator for Lauwe

     

  • Leichtling, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report for Leichtling

    This has been a very quiet year for Leichtling as far as inquiries go. We have had maybe five or six and linked two families working on the same line. That is always fun as they are distant cousins.

    All the data for Leichtling is now on the website at www.leichtling.com  or http://www.boydhouse.com/leichtling.  This includes all the 1834, 1850, and "First Settlers List", history of the village, the village database (everyone known to ever live in Leichtling), village "move ins" and "move outs", some parish records In Kansas of Leichtling villagers, a letter from Michael Lang written in the USA about how he made it through WWI in Russia and how he escaped Russia after the war, an interview with my Grandfather who was born in Leichtling and grew up there until he was 16, and more.

    The website still continues to get a good amount of hits (views). The database was updated three times. As always I am looking for items to place on the website.  I am still hoping for the newer 1857 census records.

    If you have questions on Leichtling Russia or have information, please give me a call.  I'd love to talk with you.

    Darryl Boyd
    Village Coordinator for Leichtling

     

  • Leipzig, Bessarabia

 

  • Liebenthal, Volga

2010 Village Report

Following the 2010 convention in Lincoln, I decided to serve as Liebenthal's village coordinator.  I have not accomplished much yet, but have gotten a few church records from the LDS microfilm for Liebenthal.


Jerry Braun

Village Coordinator for Liebenthal

 

  • Lillienfeld, North Caucasus

.

  • Louis, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report

     

    This year I have not received nearly as many inquiries as in the previous years.  I do try to answer them as soon as I receive them.  I believe in my folder there are four inquiries.  Now that I have sent my report, I will start a new file for the inquiries that I will receive in 2011, beginning with today's date.

    My life consists of living half the year in Arizona and the other half in Kansas.  When I am in Kansas I do not have a full reference library with me and sometimes have to get back to them at a later date for further information as it is impossible to take everything along with me for the summer.  Everyone has been so patient with me under these conditions.

    I have so many plans for my villages, and not enough time.  My book about my Mom and Dad is nearly finished.  I will be publishing it next month, hopefully.  I will then be able to spend more time on gathering more information on the villages.

    I will continue to publish a quarterly Newsletter which I did accomplish even with all the time spent on my book.
    I plan to vastly enlarge my web page after first updating it.
    I plant to collect many more family genealogies of my villages.
    I plan try to gather pictures of the families.
    I plan to continue with my gathering obituaries.
    I plan on making a full display of my villages to bring to the conventions.

    It has taken me four years to put my book on my parents together and although I would help the inquiries that I received, I did not spend a lot of time on all of the plans I have for my Villages.  There is so much to do now but I felt my book had to take priority at this time in my life.

    I am hoping to have a lot more to report next year.

    Thelma Mills
    VC for Mariental, Louis, and Chasselois

     

  • Luzern,  Samara, Volga

 

  • Mariental, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report

     

    This year I have not received nearly as many inquiries as in the previous years.  I do try to answer them as soon as I receive them.  I believe in my folder there are 78 inquiries. Now that I have sent my report, I will start a new file for the inquiries that I will receive in 2011, beginning with today's date.

    My life consists of living half the year in Arizona and the other half in Kansas.  When I am in Kansas I do not have a full reference library with me and sometimes have to get back to them at a later date for further information as it is impossible to take everything along with me for the summer.  Everyone has been so patient with me under these conditions.

    I have so many plans for my villages, and not enough time.  My book about my Mom and Dad is nearly finished.  I will be publishing it next month, hopefully.   I will then be able to spend more time on gathering more information on the villages.

    I will continue to publish a quarterly Newsletter which I did accomplish even with all the time spent on my book.
    I plan to vastly enlarge my web page after first updating it.
    I plant to collect many more family genealogies of my villages
    I plan try to gather pictures of the families.
    I plan to continue with my gathering obituaries
    I plan on making a full display of my villages to bring to the conventions.

    It has taken me four years to put my book on my parents together and although I would help the inquiries that I received, I did not spend a lot of time on all of the plans I have for my Villages.  There is so much to do now but I felt my book had to take priority at this time in my life.

    I am hoping to have a lot more to report next year.


    Thelma Mills
    VC for Mariental, Louis, and Chasselois

     

  • Markosowka, North Caucasus

 

  • Messer, Saratov, Volga

 

  • Molochna Colony Mennonite Villages

 

  • Moor, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report
     
    2010 was a positive year for the Moor group.
     
    Release of the Kulberg Lists gave new leads to finding the German origins of two Moor settlers.
     
    Inquiries were received from the United States, Canada, Russia and South America. These were answered as detailed as possible, but the gap in information after 1857 causes problems connecting to the older records. However, the Russian requests were more difficult because the requests were written in Cyrillic.
     
    Presentations were given at two California chapters, informing members how to find their German origins.
      
    On the negative side, the newsletter is still on hold pending my personal lightened workload.  I am trying to find another person willing to edit and compile these newsletters.
     
    We are looking forward to amazing progress in 2011 with additional presentations, new members, new German origins and hopefully renewal of the newsletter.
     
    Wayne H. Bonner


     

  • Mueller, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report
     
    This was my first year as the coordinator for Müller.  I was happy to accept this responsibility since so many of my ancestors settled in Müller, and I was sure I would be able to learn more about them by doing so.  I have not been disappointed.

    I received inquiries from members of the Nuss/Nuse/Nusz family, from the U.S. and from Germany.  They are trying to find out what became of Abel Nuss and his descendants.  They moved on to Eckheim in 1855.  In the 1857 census of Eckheim,  he was a widower, age 41, with daughters Maria Elisabeth, 18,
    Katharina Elisabeth, 15; sons Heinrich, 9; Georg 5;  Peter, 2; and baby daughter Christina Elisabeth, 6 months.  If anyone knows anything about this family, please contact me.

    Mary Forman contacted me, searching for her Heimbuch and Abig ancestors who were from Müller. Her e-mail is sr4332@dragonbbs.com if anyone has anything that will help her.

    A check was received (and greatly appreciated) from William Wiest, to help defray the cost of obtaining censuses and other records.

    From Bill Pickelhaupt, I purchased the translated partial list of 1820-1923 Lutheran Church birth and marriage records, and found several Müller families.  The record is broken down by groom surname, bride surname, place of residence of groom, birth surname, and birth location.  The Müller groom surnames include: Nuss, Loman, Koch, Leiman, Loman, Buksman, Hus, and Klein.  Bride’s surnames include: Binkowska, Buksman, Egel, Forat, Hus, Kel, Klein, Koch, Leiman, Rufel, Schreiner, and Schwab. The brides are usually from other villages.  Surnames of infants born are: Klein, Koch, Leiman, Lohmann, Nuss, and Weinbender.

    I started putting together a binder that holds Müller information (English translation is Cross Gully).

    From the Internet I was able to download the names of all Müller settlers who received a passport to travel to America in 1886, 1890-1892, 1900, 1906-1909, and 1912.  Surnames include Amend, Amendt, Badt, Bastron, Bat, Butt, Bauer, Baum, Berngardt, Brungardt, Buksmann, Ditter, Farenbruh, Flat, Frank, Frick, Fus,  Gartung, Geymbihner, Gein, Ginevald, Ginter, Hirsch, Gofmann, Goff, Gofferber, Grinevald,
    Groskopf, Gross (Goss), Gerbst, Getmann, If, Ilsen, Kaufmann, Kean, Keil, Kehter, Kisler, Klein, Knopf, Krening, Kuntsmann, Lapp, Lebzak, Lenenshmidt, Leongard, Leongardt, Lesseur,Linker, Lutz, Miller, Mouth, Nidens, Pfeyf,  Pfening, Pfladt, Raider, Reuters, Troupe, Tseyler, Urih, Vakker, Veydemann, Veytsel, Veyttsel,, Vidershpan, Vilmann,  Walter, Weber, Weiss, Wichmann, and Zel.


    There is a website which was set up several years ago by Bill Wiest, with contributions from Brian Ebel.  This can be viewed at http://webbitt.com/volga/lower/mueller.html .  The site http://www.lowervolga.org/Mueller/index.html contains all of the information from the Webbitt site and you can also access the obituaries of all those who have died, as long as you have their surname. The Kuhlberg First Settler’s list for Müller is on the website, as well as photographs taken of the remains of the village by Brian Ebel in 2000, and the report he wrote of his trip, which is very informative. The website also has a list of the surnames from the 1798 census.

    Brian goes into extensive detail about the condition of the cemetery.  That was ten years ago, and things have since changed considerably.  According to various reports on Russian websites, there have been hydroelectric dams built on the Volga River, which have caused the topography of the area to be changed.  The river is now up to and beyond the original banks, flooding the cemetery, and has caused most of the graves to be washed away, with bones often seen tumbling out of graves, and floating down the river.

    I hope to update the website or establish a new one in the coming year.

    Respectfully submitted,

    Suzanne Heinitz-Dodge
    AHSGR VC for Eckheim & Mueller

     

  • Mühlhausendorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson
     

     

  •  

  • Neu-Galka, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report

     

    Surnames for Neu-Galka include Albrecht, Bauer, Beichel, Berg, Bernhardt, Borger, Brunner, Buchhammer, Dahlinger, Diehl, Dienes, Elsasser, Fischer, Frank, Fuchs, Hanschu, Haas, Hoffman, Geier, Jost, Kloss, Kandelin, Klass, Kock, Koerbs (Kerbs), Kretz, Langhofer,  Lattner, Martin,  Meier, Riffel, Ruff, Schwab, Schneider, Schantzebach, Schick, Schimpf, Schmidt, Schenk, Sinner, Simon, Steinbach, Stuertz, Veit, Wagner, Weimer, Weisheim, Wiesner, and Ziegler.  The source list of these village surnames was the 1857 Census from Brent Mai received in the early part of 2010.

    Neu-Galka was founded in 1860 by Lutheran colonists resettling from Galka and Dobrinka. There were about 630 people who resettled in Neu Galka, with about 20 from Dobrinka and the remainder from Galka.  Surnames of people who moved to Neu-Galka were Riffel, Weimer, Hanschu, Langhofer, Wagner, Dahlinger, Brunner, Haas, Hoffman, Bernhardt, Schmidt, Dienes and Ruff.  After the deportation of 1941, the area occupied by the former village was absorbed into the nearby Russian town of Pallasovka and is today a neighborhood of Pallasovka.

    Villages in the Lower Volga region were given a fixed amount of land, as described in the history section.  Land was divided, and re-divided periodically, among the households and families in the village.  By the time of the 1850’s, the amount of land for each family was so small that families could not grow enough crops to both use as food and sell for income.

     

    The solution was to found new villages, called daughter colonies, in parts of the Lower Volga region where no villages existed.  Most of these villages were on the east side of the Volga River.

     

    Leland Riffel

    Village Coordinator for Frankreich, Neu-Galka, Strassburg, Neu-Weimar, Alt-Weimar, & Weimar

     

  • Neudorf, Glückstal, Odessa, South Russia

 

  • Neu-Moor, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report 

    Neu-Moor (Russian name Pogranichnyy), was a "grand-daughter" colony, formed in the 1920's by people living in the "mother" colony of Moor.  It was located in the Balzer District on the Bergseite (west or hilly side) of the Volga River, and was approximately 30 - 40 miles from the "mother" colony of Moor.

    Very little information is available on Neu-Moor.  I have had only one person seeking information on this colony, no one this past year.

    Irma A. Waggoner

    Village Coordinator for Neu-Moor

     

  • Neu-OberMonjou, Samara, Volga, Russia

     

  • Neu-Norka

2010 Village Report

 

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

When Neu-Norka was first settled in 1852 there were 65 original families.  My 3rd great-grandparent, Heinrich Gobel, 3rd great-grandparent George Adam, and my 1st great-grandparent Philipp Walter were among the first settlers, along with at least two dozen family members.  From my own notes and research I was able to trace the Gobel family to the Spady family, then to my 6th great-grandfather, Johannes Spady, born 1712 in Afterroth, Austria.  There are no census records after the Neu-Norka 1857 census (Brent Mai’s translation).  This is why I decided to take on the Village Coordinator position for this village.  My goal is to trace all 65 original families from this book back to their arrival in Norka in 1767.  To date I have a little over 4,000 individuals, and I'm just getting started.

I have had four inquires and was able to answer all.  Names researched were Adams, Kilthau, and Reifschneider.  I had some help from Eleanor Sissell, Kukkus Village Coordinator.  I sent Carol George, the requestor, ninety pages of information.  I just received a request from Richard Kraft and will be working on the Kraft name.  This will be interesting because there is a village named Kraft.

As for my research on the Schwartz name, I have had an update request to Dr. Pleve for over eleven years on the Schwartz family tree.  I'm looking for my father, Henry Schwartz, born 19 December 1894, in Norka, and my grandfather George Peter Schwartz born about 1860 in Norka.  He was married to Katherine Katie Lutzin, born 16 January 1864, and was from Latvia. George was a blacksmith in Norka when he disappeared in 1904.  Great-aunt Elisabeth Schwartz, was born about 1870 in Norka.  She married Peter Feagler.  Great-uncle John Henry Schwartz, born 21 December 1874 in Norka, married Katherine Elisabeth Adam.  She was an orphan and possibly raised by an uncle named Haas.

 My Fathers Family: Aunt Elisabeth Schwartz was born about 1882 in Norka.  She married and was left behind in Russia.  Aunt Molly Schwartz was born about 1884 in Norka, was married and was also left behind in Russia.  There are no records.  My uncle John Schwartz was born 23 May 1887 in Norka.  My Father Henry was born 19 December 1894.  Aunt Annie Schwartz was born 17 September 1904 in Norka.  With my grandmother, this family left Norka, Russia in 1908 for Canada.


If anybody out there can help me with the Schwartz name I would love to hear from you.  At age 73, I sure would like to know where the other half of my family originated.

Marvin L. Schwartz

Village Coordinator for Neu-Norka

  • Neu-Straub, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report

    From the five inquiries I received, I was able to help connect two of them, but they were not from Neu-Straub.  I was also able to connect two cousins from different states, again, neither from Neu-Straub but because of their names and a church from which both were associated.  I had history of the church and found they were related.

    I have very few names that claim Neu-Straub as their village.  If others would contact me with their family information, perhaps they could be helped.


    Lillian Larwig

    Village Coordinator for Neu-Straub

     

  • Neu-Weimar, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report

     

    Surnames for Neu-Weimer include Abich, Bathauer, Bischoff, Brauer, Breyer, Brunner, Deisner, Diehl, Dieterle, Eichmann, Erbes, Ernst, Flath, Frank, Fritzler, Gerlach, Graff, Grohs, Hefele, Heinrich, Herbel, Kahl, Klauser, Kretz ,Krispins, Lotz, Martin, Meier, Müller, Neuwirt, Nuss, Peil, Peter, Rau, Riel, Rusch, Schimpf, Schlotthauer, Schmidt, Schmunk, Schön, Seifert, Siebenlist, Siegfried, Simon, Taudt, Traudt, Utz, Vogel, Weber, Weimer, Wilhelm, Wolf, and Würtz.  The source list of these village surnames was the 1857 Census from Brent Mai received in the early part of 2010.

     

    Neu-Weimar was founded in 1861 as a Lutheran colony by colonists who relocated to Neu-Weimar came from Galka, Stephan, Schwab and Dobrinka.

     

    Villages in the Lower Volga region were given a fixed amount of land, as described in the history section.  Land was divided, and re-divided periodically, among the households and families in the village.  By the time of the 1850’s, the amount of land for each family was so small that families could not grow enough crops to both use as food and sell for income.

     

    The solution was to found new villages, called daughter colonies, in parts of the Lower Volga region where no villages existed.  Most of these villages were on the east side of the Volga River.

     

    Leland Riffel

    Village Coordinator for Frankreich, Neu-Galka, Strassburg, Neu-Weimar, Alt-Weimar, & Weimar

     

  • Neu-Yagodnaya, Samara, Volga
     

     

  • Nieder-Monjou, Samara, Volga

    2010 VC Report

    It has been a quiet year for Nieder-Monjou research. During the past year we received six queries concerning the following Nieder-Monjou surnames: ANSCHUETZ, BIENEDELL, JUSTUS, NINNSTHIEL, ROSENGREN, SCHAEFER, SCHMIDT, and SPECHT. The queries came from Argentina, Russia, Germany, South Africa and the United States.

    We also added a number of photographs of individuals to the Nieder-Monjou web site.

    A BETZ surname chart is now available from AHSGR.

    Michael Grau and Steven Grau 

    Village Coordinators for Nieder-Monjou

     

  • North Caucasus
     

     
  •  

  • Ober-Monjou, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report

    This has been a productive year with new information coming in. I have received a number of inquiries from Germany, Russia, Argentina, Canada and the United States.

    I have been in contact with a man from Germany who has been sending copies of his research dealing with the families of Krapp, Fischer, Hertel and Dechant.  Many of the contacts have also sent photos of their families with their genealogy information.

    A few of us here in Kansas have been working on translating a number of the LDS records that we can find that deal with our colonies.  Most of these are for the years after the 1880's.  We have been very lucky to find translators who are willing to translate in order to also get a copy of this information.

    I attended the AHSGR Convention that was held in Lincoln this past summer and brought along a tri-fold display of my village.  In October our local Sunflower Chapter sponsored the annual Kansas Roundup of Chapters and many members brought their village displays and genealogical information to share.

    I subscribe to the magazine, "Volk Auf Dem Weg" which at times provides a lot of interesting books that are released from Germany.   The magazine also contains information from people who had recently 
    died in Germany who have ties to the Volga area, as well as birthday and anniversary wishes.

    My database contains 91,815 surnames of those families from the Volga area, U.S., Germany, South America, Canada and Russia.

    My research material at this time for Obemrunjou includes:

    Pleve's - Lists of Colonists to Russia in 1766
    Einwanderung in das Wolgagebiet (4 vols.)
    1798 Census compiled by Brent Mai
    1834 Census (incomplete)
    1850 Census
    1857 Census
    Birth Records:  1821-1826, 1827-1835, 1849-1855, 1855-1866, 1866-1918.  Some years are spotty.
    Marriages Records:  1839-1840, 1850-1858, 1860-1864, 1876-1911
    Death Records:  1850-1855, 1856-1876. 1890-1906, 1907-1918

    So far I have not found any Village Family Lists for Obermunjou.

    I do have a website, www.volgagerman.net.  The site is broken down into many areas, Ellis County local VG villages, and villages on the Volga.

    Kevin Rupp

    Village Coordinator for Obermunjou


  • Odessa, Odessa, South Russia

    2010 Village Report

    This year there have been no new enquiries.  In fact, in the two and a half years since I assumed the responsibilities of coordinator for the city of Odessa, the low number of enquiries has been puzzling. When we consider that one hundred years ago there were 10,000 Germans living in the city of Odessa
    alone, can it really be possible that there are so few of their descendants in North America? What happened, and where did they go?

    As we all know, during the turbulent years between the two world wars, famine, imprisonment, violent death, and deportation to remote corners of the Soviet Union took a heavy toll on the Germans in Russia. We also know that many were able to flee the country, and that many emigrated to the United States, Canada, and South America.  The question I have been pondering is this: if it is indeed the case that the surviving Germans from the city of Odessa did not come in large numbers to the Americas, where did they go?  Could the answer have to do with the fact that, unlike the majority of their fellow
    countrymen from the villages in the Odessa region who were engaged in agriculture, the city dwellers were largely business people and professionals?  Additionally, was not the primary attraction of North America the promise of land to farm?  It is quite possible that, rather than emigrating to the Americas, many, if not most of the surviving Germans from the city of Odessa simply returned to the German-speaking region of Europe from which they or their ancestors had come.

    I would be interested in hearing from anyone who would like to discuss this topic, or who can shed any light on it, and am always interested in hearing from anyone whose ancestors lived in the city of Odessa.

    Respectfully submitted,

    Ella M. Melik
    Village Coordinator for Odessa

     

     
  • Old Swedish Villages

     

  • Orlovskoye, Samara, Volga

 

  • 2010 Village Report

    This year I learned about three daughter colonies which Paulskoye families had helped establish.

    Source:   (http://www.wolgadeutschen.borda.ru/?1-6-0-00000029-000-0-0)

     

    This information greatly helps in my understanding of what became of some colonists who seemingly "disappeared" between census years 1834 and 1850. These daughter colonies were:
     
    1.  Neu-Boaro [Neu-Boisroux, Nowoje Bordowoje, Novoborodovka] (est.  1848) by colonists from Orlovskoye, Boaro, Philippsfeld, and Paulskoye; village located in Kanton Marxstadt.  I have a copy of the census records for 1850, 1857, and 1865.
     
    2. Lilienfeld [Liliental, Belopolje] (est. 1848) by colonists from Katharinenstadt, Orlovskoye, Boaro, Ernestinendorf, Philipsfeld, Kano, Paulskoye and Beauregard; village located in Kanton Mariental. I have a copy of the census records for 1850 and 1857.
     
    3. Rosental [Rosowka, Rozovka] (est. 1848) by colonists from Katharinenstadt, Orlovskoye, Boaro, Philippsfeld, Kano, Paulskoje, and Beauregard; village located in Kanton Krasny-Kut.  I have a copy of the census records for 1850, 1857, and 1865.
     
    In terms of inquires, I received just two inquires this year---both from abroad. One was from a Julia MERKEL of Argentina. Her grandparents were MERKEL (b. Paulskoye) and HEIDE or HEIT [HEIDT] (b. Unknown) who resided at some point in Colonia 2 (known today at Pueblo San Jose) in Buenos Aires
    Province, Argentina.  A good "jumping-off" point for Argentine Volga German genealogy can be found at:  (http://cvgs.cu-portland.edu/immigration/Argentina.cfm).  Be sure to check out the "Provinces of Immigration" links for details about the various settlements and in some cases names of early settlers, cemetery records, etc.  The second inquiry came from a young man named Alexander WEDE of Germany. Our email exchanges provided the other with valuable genealogical and historical information. It turns out we are 6th cousins.
     
    Finally, Jon Hardt graciously provided me with an electronic format of his Pleve commissioned chart of the Hardts of Paulskoje/Enders which includes additional research for those persons who immigrated to the United States.  Contributions of Paulskoye-focused Pleve charts to this Village Coordinator
    are always welcome!
     
    Respectfully Submitted,


    Tim Weeder
    Village Coordinator for Paulskoye

     

  • Pfeifer, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report

    The usual number of inquiries came from the United States.  Three were from Argentina.  One was from
    Russia and this year one came from Kazakhstan.  One interesting inquiry was from Miss Castillo of Brazil.

    In May, Miss Castillo was traveling to Moscow as part of the diplomatic corps to make arrangements for a meeting of the president of Brazil to promote trade between Brazil and Russia.  Her position is in the Division of Operations in the Ministry of Commercial Investments.

    Miss Castillo stated that her grandfather was Peter Eckermann and was born in Pfeifer, Saratov area, in 1874.  Since I do not have records for that year, I suggested she contact Dr. Pleve in Saratov to make an appointment to see him while in Russia to obtain information about her ancestors.  She obtained the information for which she was looking from Dr. Pleve.

    Respectfully submitted,


    Rosemary Wiesner Larson
    Village Coordinator for Pfeifer

 

  • Pobochnoye, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report

    This year we have received requests from abroad, mainly Germany.  Ella Wilhelm of Hamburg was born in the Urals in 1953.  Her parents were deported in 1941 with the general deportation of the Volga Germans.   She is searching for relatives and researching information on the "home village".  Another request came from Katrin (Wilhelm) Rudi, also of Hamburg.   She too is a descendent of the 1941 deportation to Siberia.
     
    Probably the highlight of our research year was the visitation of Alex and Valentina Wilhelm in October to the location where Pobochnoye used to be located, i.e. 40 miles northwest of Saratov.  Now it is bare ground.   Even weeds will not grow there.  We had thought that Pobochnoye ceased to exist after the German farmers were deported in the fall of 1941.  Alex and Valentina found a German lady who was born in the village in 1953.   Her German mother had married a Russian man, so they were not deported in 1941.  They had later moved away, however.  After the husband died, t he wife and children moved back to the ruins of Pobochnoye.  The village lasted until the early 1970s. 
     
    Alex and Valentina walked around on the bare ground.  It was still possible to tell where homesteads had been.  Certain trees outlined gardens and barnyards.  It was a very emotional experience for cousin Alex.  Here he was on the site where his father and grandfather had walked and lived!  It was very moving.
     
     At the Saratov Archives, Alex ordered and paid for copies of some documents.  That was mid-October.  Now, at the end of November, he has still not received the copied documents.  And so it goes.  A researcher has to be patient and persistent.
     
    Laurin Wilhelm

    Village Coordinator for Pobochnoye

     

    Alex Wilhelm

    Speyer, Germany

     

     

  • Polish Volhynia
     

    2010 Village Report for Polish Volhynia and Volhynia

    It has been a good year for Polish Volhynian and Volhynian research.  Leona Janke's translation of the book "Introduction to the Legends of the Germans in Volhynia and Polesys (Sagen der Deutschen in Wolhynien und Polesien" edited by Alfred Karasek-Langer and Elfrieda Strzygowski Sketches by
    Friedrich Kunitzer has been published and is now available in the AHSGR bookstore.  At the AHSGR Convention in Lincoln, the Volhynian display board and research binder were viewed by many interested attendees.  Messages were exchanged by post-it notes on the display board when I couldn't be available
    during the convention.  The Volhynian table at Village Night was shared with members of the Mennonite group where mutual sharing took place, particularly where to look for resources.

     

    Two new Volhynian researchers were able to get valuable information on how to begin their research.  In August 2010, I attended the Society for German Genealogy in Eastern Europe (SGGEE) Convention in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada where AHSGR Nation's Capital Area Chapter President Edie Adams spoke about her research to find her roots in Volhynia.  On November 20, 2010, I attended an afternoon session with a Ukrainian lady speaker from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.  She was born in Chishky near Lvov and immigrated to Canada in 1985.  Her talk and slides covered the history of the Ukrainian region, its rulers, conquerors and resources up to and including the Soviet era.  She has published a book in Ukrainian of stories of people from the village and is working on a second book about the history of the area.

     

    Over the past year there have been two queries.  Following are surnames in the Polish Volhynian and Volhynian database:  Adam, Arndt, Behnke, Berezowski, Benz, Berg, Bieberdorf, Buller(s), Borchert, Busse, Cantor, Chepel, Daher, Dause, Domrose, Drews, Fetter, Fitzer,  Gertz, Goering, Gramm, Hartwig, Hepp, Hiller, Hintz, Hinz, Janke, Jantz, Jenke, Jenz, Joseph, Kapro(w)sky, Katha, Kathke, Katke, Koestel-Otto, Kolenosky(Kalinowsky), Kopp, Krentz, Krueger, Kunkel, Loewen, Lucas, Lutz, Marks, Matz, Morganstern, Muhlbeier, Muehlbeier, Neufeld, Neumann, Nickel, Nikkel, Olufka, Olsufka, Olszowka, Patzer, Pfenning, Plieske, Plines, Plischke, Rappauhn, Rast, Ratz, Retzlaff, Rosen, Schmidt, Schroeder,
    Schultz, Schwanke, Schwandtke, Schwark, Schwarz, Sempf, Sieberts, Ulm, Weick, Wedman, Weidermann, Wendler, Woitt, Zedelmayer, Zietz, and Zuch.

    Mabel Kiessling

    Village Coordinator for Polish Volhynia and Volhynia

     

  • Reinhard(t), Samara, Volga

 

  • Reinwald, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report

    There was significant activity for this village in 2010. The 1850 and 1857 censuses became available through Brent Mai and I was able to obtain copies.  It provided a lot of information.  Using the 1798 census and the settlement list, I was able to piece together many families.  However, much of the information just added pieces of clues that cannot be tied to information which I already had.

     

    I received several queries for one particular family.  The parties were from all over the country and were not aware of their other relatives looking for information.  I provided names and addresses to all those involved and now they are working together on their family tree.

     

    I received several requests from Russia and one from Germany of people trying to connect to relatives in the United States.  One of the Russian contacts provided a listing of all the Ruppels who were born in Reinwald.  Working together, a family chart was developed and I was able to provide a contact for relatives in the Saginaw Michigan area.

     

    I have copies of the settlement list that included 230 people, the 1798 census with 59 households, the 1850 census with 182 households and 1905 people and the 1857 census with 191 households and 2,204 people. 

    Sue Hess

    Village Coordinator for Reinwald

     

  • Rohleder, Samara, Volga

     

  • Rohrbach, Berezan, Odessa, Kherson

    2010 Village Report for Rohrbach and Worms

    Beresan District, Odessa Ukraine

     

    Worms and Rohrbach are only about four miles apart and about sixty miles northeast of Odessa.  There was a great deal of intermarriage between the two villages, and most of the Reformed church members were baptized in Rohrbach.  Consequently, it is difficult to separate inquiries between Worms and Rohrbach.

     

    I probably received twenty inquiries about family members from the two villages and have referred them to the Personal Ancestral File (PAF) data for these two villages. I've also referred them to the Odessa project.  Most inquiries are from individuals in the United States although one individual lives in Germany.  A major part of his family, however, settled in the United States.

     

    In the process of corresponding with individuals regarding inquiries, I have discovered two new family members who are distant relatives.  I also received correspondence and family histories, some of which describes what happened to those who remained in Russia.  These histories have provided insight into Stalin's Holocaust and some of the material was used in a recent AHSGR Journal.  Most of the contacts have been the result of my website, www.jimgriess.net.  Since its inception, the website has received 16,455 hits. Three of my relatives and I will be traveling to the Ukraine this summer to visit Worms, Rohrbach, the Ochsner Estates, and other locations along the North Shore of the Black Sea. 

     

    Jim Griess          

    Village Coordinator for Rohrbach and Worms

     

  • Rosenberg / Umet, Saratov, Volga

     

    2010 Village Report

    As for recent years this has been a very quiet one for Rosenberg village. The website www.rosenbergvillage.org is still active although there has been no new data received to put on it in the last year.  A very small amount of late 1890s and early 1900s parish records are apparently in existence although I have not seen much detail from them. There is a serious lack of information relating to the period 1860-1900 where quite a few families are stuck. Perhaps one day some new material will emerge. The website is currently hosted by Yahoo who now charges per annum for material to be there since they closed ‘geocities’. I have been considering the possibility of migrating the material to Rootsweb but that needs to be planned to coincide with subscription renewal so will not happen yet.

    I was contacted by nine individuals covering the following families, and most often interest was in the 1857 census (the only one for Rosenberg):  Schneider and Major (my own families as it happens); Reizenstein and Mueller; Ziegler and Dalinger (an enquiry from Germany);  Sterkel and Ziegler (again); Schuckmann and Weber (more recent arrival in Germany from Russia);  Schmunck (a third enquiry from Germany);  Fritzler;  Graf and Buchhammer;  Grauberger and Martin. This last correspondent recognized a website photo as one her mother had in her home.  Her comment was interesting and I quote it here:

         [Begins] The date on the photo says circa 1910.  Not long after, she left Russia with her husband Johann Christof Grauberger.  The story the family always told was that he was supposed to go into the Russian army, and that her father helped them get out of the country through some type of “underground” system.  They were caught at one point and put in jail, but her father got them out.  My mother thought that he may have had some kind of influence (like the mayor of the village) to be able to get them out of the country. They left everyone behind… [Ends]

    There was an interesting clarification of an entry in the 1857 of Rosenberg ha came my way from Brent Mai.  It concerned the Heilbrun family who arrived in Rosenberg in 1857. By the way, Rosenberg did exist as a small farming community called Umet (Umet Ilovlinska) - as I understand it ‘the farm on the river Ilovla’ - and that is today the Russian name of the village.  I hope he won’t mind but I think it would be valuable for Village Coordinators to see slightly edited answers to two questions that he gave to the original enquiry:

    Q:   If Rosenberg census lists Christian Heilbrun as ‘died in 1853’ how could he be in the Huck 1857 census?
    A:  As I’ve been doing a lot of daughter colonies of late, this is a phenomenon that I’ve seen often.  The data from the 1857 mother colony census (for the men at least) is transferred in its entirety to the daughter colony, even if the man died before the family left for the daughter colony.  Consequently the death is recorded in both places.  I’ve also learned that it is difficult to determine, however, exactly when these folks moved.  There were some daughter colonies (those on the southern edge of the Bergseite especially, and of which Rosenberg is one) that were inhabited as far back as the 1820s.  However, they did not become “official” until the 1848-1858 period when daughter colonies were “permitted” to be established.  So these families could have been living there long before Rosenberg was officially recognized as a settlement
     
    Q: Why would the males be listed in two 1857 village censuses?
    A: Remember that these documents are not censuses as we consider them here in the States. They were not a “snapshot in time” like we have, but a tracking mechanism.  Some of the Russian documents indicate movement to daughter colonies on the 1857 census but most don’t. 

    Professor Richard McGregor
    Village Coordinator for Rosenberg

     

  • Rosenfeld, North Caucasus

2010 Village Report

Hi everyone. Greetings from Rosenheim! I have now spent my first year as Village Coordinator and have an understanding of what has gone on in the past with the village. There has been a lot of work done and I intend to take the Rosenheim Village Coordinator position to the next level by getting the village on the Internet with Facebook, as many other VC's have already done. I have received two inquiries about past residents and I look forward to more in the future.

I do have a great spreadsheet of past residents from the village but it has many gaps and holes where generations are missing. Thanks to Jim Osborne of the Northern Illinois Chapter, there are several microfilms on permanent loan at the Newbury Library in Chicago. These films are in the old Russian script but they contain Volga Village Census reports from 1834, 1850, and 1857. Perhaps there may be other information as well. I made digital copies of the first page of many of the reports in order to find out what town each was from. The nice lady who cuts my hair was born in Russia and has generously translated the first page of each of these census reports for me so I could find out which one is from Rosenheim. Now I that I know what Rosenheim looks like, I will go back to the Newbury library and make complete copies of the Rosenheim census from 1834, 1850, and 1857. The year 1798 is already translated through AHSGR. This should help link my family as well as others to the First Settlers List and hopefully fill in gaps and confirm some of the mysteries that three generations of my family have been trying to unlock.

Since I knew what roll of film Rosenheim was on, I only made copies of that roll. Other rolls have many other villages on them. The villages on film roll # GS2373592 from 1857 are in order on the roll as follows: 1) Graff, 2) Schaefer, 3) Urbach, 4) Nieder-Monjou, 5) Louis, 6) Reinhard, 7) Rosenheim, 8) Rohleder or Schoenchen, 9) Belarus or Minsk or Bobruysk, 10) Herzog, 11) Fischer, and 12) Mariental houses1-117. I believe the rest of the houses from Mariental are on the beginning of film roll #LDS2373592. If anyone would like to have a copy of any of these first pages of their 1857 town census please email me at dfunkmusic@yahoo.com and I will forward a copy to you. This will allow someone to go to the Newbury Library and find the correct village. Only a minimal amount of material is allowed to be brought into the library so please call ahead and know what the rules are.

Technology and your dedication to preserving our history will hopefully allow us all to find out the secrets of the past and trace the steps of our great ancestors who sacrificed and endured so much to make a better life for their families. Have a great 2011.


Duane Funk
Village Coordinator for Rosenheim

  • Rosenheim, Samara, Volga

 

  • Rothammel, Saratov, Volga

  • Schaffhausen, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report

    Eight enquiries relating to Schaffhausen matters were received during the past year, primarily from established  fellow  Schaffhausen researchers who, unfortunately,  are still rather few in number.

     I concur with a previous post regarding the desirability of census data from 1879-1900. As the existing 1857 Schaffhausen census is incomplete and as most enquires relate to recent genealogy, data from the mid 19th century would be very desirable.  However, it is appreciated that such data may not be
    readily available.

     I am still working on compiling a de facto list of original Schaffhausen settlers which is being compared to the first known census compiled in 1798. I look forward to attending a future AHSGR Convention and comparing notes with other Village Coordinators and hopefully sourcing new Schaffhausen researchers.

    I have spent considerable time researching and, despite language limitations, engaging Russian and German Genealogy websites.  Some of these such as "Geschichte der Wolgadeutsche" offer new sources of information from comparatively recent German emigrants from Russia. I would encourage
    collaboration between AHSGR and such organization as I believe there is considerable synergy in our aims.  I have obtained photographs of Schaffhausen from these websites which unfortunately show that the church and school have been virtually totally destroyed.  I intend to visit Russia in 2011 and will attempt to visit Schaffhausen and record what is left of the Volga German heritage.

    I would like to convey my thanks to Waldemar Lehmann, Pat Lipphardt and Tanja Schell for their continued assistance this year. Tanja's language skills and local knowledge are invaluable assets and have enabled me to locate previously unknown relatives in Russia.

    I wish everyone a happy Christmas and a prosperous New Year.



    Regards,

    Jim Parsonage
    Village Coordinator for Schaffhausen
    Brisbane Australia

     

     
  • Schilling, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report for Schilling Villages 

    Church records for the original Schilling village (Alt-Schilling) are at the Russian Archives at Engels.  Records include birth records for 1764-1878, a register of the Lutheran congregation from 1865 to 1931, and a family list created in 1883, which gives a list of people in a family and their ages.


    Engels does not sell copies of church records, but will create a report on a surname.  The reports, written in Russian, give the head of household and a birth date, the wife’s name (including maiden name) and age, a list of children with birth dates, and the year a daughter was married.  A report
    covering a period of 1860 to 1910 is inexpensive (less than $100), but the translation fee and other fees double or triple the cost of the report.  Several people with Schilling connections have ordered these reports in the past year.

     Schilling had eight daughter colonies in the Volga region (Alexandertal, Konstantinovka, Schilling, Neu-Schilling I, Neu-Schilling II, Hoffental, Gnadenfeld and Brunnental), with translated 1857 censuses being available for Alexandertal, Konstantinovka,  Hoffental, Gnadenfeld and Brunnental.  Schilling was located about 1-2 kilometers from Konstantinovka and over time the villages merged.  Some additional information on these villages is available at http://www.schillinggr.org/schillings.html.

     The Russian Archives in Saratov has the following information on Neu-Schilling I & Neu-Schilling II:  births 1871 to 1921 and deaths 1901 to 1921.  Information for a similar period of time is available for the village of Konstantinovka.

    I continue to maintain the web site for Schilling at: http://www.schillinggr.org/.

     Several dozen inquiries were received involving people from several countries, namely the United States, Canada, and Argentina.  Many were received from German-Russian descendants living in Germany and Russia.  The Schilling database has over 12,000 people, and continues to expand.

    Gary Martens

    Village Coordinator for Dobrinka, Galka, Neu-Weimar & Schilling Villages

 

  • Schilling, Saratov, Volga

 

  • Schlangendorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson

     

  • Schönchen, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report

     

    We continue to have very few requests for Schönchen records from their descendents.  In the past year, we have had only one request in the United States and continue to keep in contact with a friend in Germany whose family came from Schönchen, Russia. 

     Records we have available to us are:
          Einwanderung in das Wolgagebiet, 1764-1767 (4 vols.) by Igor  Pleve
         German Migration to the Russian Volga (1764-1767) by Brent Mai
         Pleve's - Lists of Colonists to Russia in 1766
         Transport of the Volga Germans from Oranienbaum to the  Colonies on the Volga, 1766-1767 by Brent Mai
         1798 Schönchen, Russia Census compiled by Brent Mai
         1857 Schönchen,  Russia Census compiled by Kevin Rupp
     
     Searching the Tagillage website for persons born in Schönchen returns  results for the following family names:  Boos, Gaus/Haus/ Hepner, Goetz,  Doering, Rupp and Stark.
     
    Through LDS, we have been able to get translations of baptisms (1888), marriages (1879, 1881, 1892, 1906 and 1909), and deaths (1889).  Documents still waiting to be translated include: deaths (1891 and 1892), and baptisms and marriages (1914).  The only remaining LDS film we have not yet copied or translated is deaths (1914).  A database of these records has been submitted or is currently in the process of being submitted to AHSGR.
     
     Our website is:  http://volga.schoenchen.org:8000/index.htm.
     
    We welcome and encourage all who are researching their ancestors from Schönchen, Russia to contact us.
     
    Terri Dann
    Denise Grau

    Village Coordinators for Schönchen

     

  • Schöndorf, Samara, Volga

     

  • Schönfeld, Samara, Volga

     

  • Schöntal, Samara, Volga

     

  • Schuck, Saratov, Volga
     

     

  • Schulz, Samara, Volga

 
  • Schwab, Saratov, Volga

     

  • Schwed, Samara, Volga

     

  • Seewald, Saratov, Volga

 

  • Shcherbakovka, Saratov, Volga

    2010 Village Report for Shcherbakovka

    I am the village coordinator for the village of Shcherbakovka (aka Tscherbakowka and Mühlberg).  Information for this village can be found at http://www.lowervolga.org/index.html.

    Communication activity has been down this year, but I've had contact with several people researching ancestors from our village and was able to supply helpful information to them.  I maintain several databases, but the most helpful is my database that is made up SOLELY from information from the 1798, 1834, 1850 and 1857 censuses, Pleve charts for our village, and extracted church records from the Lutheran Church in Shcherbakovka.

    Janet Laubhan Flickinger

    Village Coordinator for Shcherbakovka

     

  • Solodyri, Volynsk, Volhynia U

 

  • Stahl am Tarlyk, Samara, Volga

     

  • Strassburg, Samara, Volga.

    2010 Village Report for Strassburg

     

    Surnames for Strassburg include Balzer, Bauer, Blähm, Blehm, Breyer, Briegemann, Busch, Clauser, Deisner, Dieterle, Engel, Ephraim, Geiss, Gerlach, Graff, Günther, Heidelbach, Heinze, Helwer, Herdt, Klauser, Koerbs (Kerbs), Körbs, Krispins, Lattner, Meier, Metzler, Müller, Opfer, Rau, Repp, Sauerwein, Schäfer, Schlotthauer, Schmidt, Schmunk, Schreiner, Schuber, Seifert, Seigfried, Stuertz, Stürtz, Vogel, Völker, Wassenmüller, and Weber.  The source list of these village surnames was the 1857 Census from Brent Mai received in the early part of 2010.

     

    Strassburg was founded in 1860 along the left bank of the Torgun River as a Lutheran colony. The original resettlers were from the colonies of Galka, Shcherakovka, Kraft, Schwab, Holstein, Dobrinka, and Balzar.  Following the 1941 Deportations, the village was known by its Russian name of Romashki which means daisies.

     

    Villages in the Lower Volga region were given a fixed amount of land, as described in the history section.  Land was divided, and re-divided periodically, among the households and families in the village.  By the time of the 1850’s, the amount of land for each family was so small that families could not grow enough crops to both use as food and sell for income.

     

    The solution was to found new villages, called daughter colonies, in parts of the Lower Volga region where no villages existed.  Most of these villages were on the east side of the Volga River.

     

    Leland Riffel

    Village Coordinator for Frankreich, Neu-Galka, Strassburg, Neu-Weimar, Alt-Weimar, & Weimar


  • Strassendorf, Samara, Volga
     

     

  • Straub, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report
     
    I have had the following inquiries for Straub this year:  Winter, Roth, Schwabenland and Karle.
     
    Pleve's book, Volume 4, contains the Straub first settlers list and his new  book with the Kuhlburg Lists have helped me find more Straub settlers. 
     
    Straub had 191 people (58 families) arrive on May 12, 1767.  I have been trying to find the Straub first settler's on the Kuhlberg lists and have found that some died between arriving in Oranienburg in 1766 and dying  enroute to Straub before May 12, 1767.  Sometimes the Kuhlburg list has a better place of origin for the colonist---city instead of area.
     
    The 1850 and 1857 Straub census lists are available for purchase from Brent Mai.  Getting these census records has helped me add more people to my Straub file.
     
    I continue to do a Straub newsletter twice a year.  I had a complied book about Straub and a brochure about Straub on the Heritage Hall table at the Lincoln convention.

     

    Sharon White
    Village Coordinator for Straub

     

  • Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson

    2010 Village Report for Swedish Villages
     
    We had only one inquiry for Klosterdorf this year for which I wasn't able to provide much help.  There is little information available for the Catholic Church records.

    The availability of the Lutheran Church records online at the LDS website has made research in these villages a lot simpler.

    Karen Wright
    Village Coordinator for Swedish Villages

    Alt-Schwedendorf, Klosterdorf, Mühlhausendorf, Schlangendorf

 

 

  • Unterwalden Meinhard, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report

     

    Unterwalden/Meinhard, a Lutheran village, was established on 12 June 1767 by Baron Caneau de Beauregard.  It was one of the 27 "Beauregard Colonies" and was named for the Swiss Canton "Unterwalden".  The name Meinhard, for which it is also known, was named for an early "mini mayor" Meinhardt.  The Russian name is Podlesnoye.  Unterwalden was one of the original Mother Colonies.  It is located on the Wiesenseite of the Volga River between Sussanental and Luzern.  Unterwalden is 75 versta (about 50 miles) from Saratov. It can be found on the Volga River north of Saratov, near Sosnovka (Sussanental) and Baskakovka (Kind). 
     
    I have only had a couple of new contacts this year which were referred from contacts made last year.  From information from one contact, I was able to locate some long lost information about our village and a couple of families from the AHSGR library. 
     
    My village contacts and I continue to await the translation of the 1857 Census which is on LDS microfilm.  I also wish to thank Bill Picklehaupt (Village Coordinator for Kind) for sharing his findings for the Nab Parish and his numerous other discoveries.
     
    I look forward to 2011 and what new discoveries and connections are made for the village of Unterwalden and the Salt Lake City AHSGR Convention. 
     
    Pennie Elder 
    Village Coordinator for Unterwalden (Meinhard)

     

  • Volhynia
     

 

  • 2010 Village Report

    I had about 30 requests for information and was able to help most of them.  People have sent replies saying how much they appreciate the help that we Village Coordinators provide.  If only we could get the census closer to 1900. That would solve so many questions.

    My group is on Facebook under Volmer, but there have been no responses.

     

    I acquired a copy of the Kuhlberg lists.

    New ideas and information are welcomed.


    Cathy Hawinkels

    Village Coordinator for Volmer

     

  • 2010 Village Report

     

    The Village of Walter (Grechinnaya Luka - Buckwheat Meadow) was one of the original Volga Mother Colonies and is located in the Canton of Frank on the Medveditza River.  Its daughter colony of Walter Khutor is located about 15-20 miles to the north.

    This has been an exciting year for Walter with the addition of a new Village Coordinator - Michael Fyler, who is proving to be an invaluable addition and a move to future continuity and responsibility for this project. We have also added more people to the Walter Research team with Jerry McInnis, Dorothy Elrod, and Mary Jane Bolton.  We have been able to divide our efforts to be more productive.

    Other members of the team include the valuable research done by Tanja Schell and Oksana Dorn and the many new extraordinary photographs taken by Tanja and Russian photographer Vladimir Krainov. He has captured the beauty of the Church and given us interior shots that we had never seen before. Other excellent photos have been taken by Steve Schreiber, Jerry McIinnis, Mary Mills, Henry Kosak, Waldemar Gill, Nina Lindt, Alexander and Georiy Spack. While little remains of Walter except for the Church and reserve grainery, and two original houses - the scenery surrounding Walter has been enlightening. We have also received a few picture s of Walter Khutor and the Prayer House has been restored and used as a community center.

     

    Our acquisition of thousands of records for our village, as part of the Volgograd Records project, has been a lifelong dream after struggling to compile vital records of villagers one small step at a time. The following records were received from the Volgograd Archives and German translation has now been completed this year by Village Coordinators Mary Mills, and Michael Fyler and Russian records by Jerry McInnis, with Indexing by Dorothy Elrod:

     

    Births - 1829-1900, 1903-1913
    Deaths - 1839-1870, 1903-1904
    Marriages - 1839-1870, 1894-1895
    Class register of Zemstva School
    Draftee Lists - 1890-1892
    Extracts from the family list on military duty 1903, 1907, 1909, 1911, 1912-1918

     

    These records are part of the Volgograd Records project obtained by Doris Evans, Frank Village Coordinator.  Fundraising is actively continuing and Doris has been partially reimbursed for the thousands of dollars spent to obtain the records. They have been a valuable asset in putting together family groups.

     

    Exciting this year is the publication on a CD of a History of Walter. This 287 page book is richly illustrated and includes many oral history interviews and letters from hell from the 1920s and 1930's. It includes a general history of Russia's Tsars, the founding of the Volga colonies, social history of the village of Walter, pictures of Walter and other sites of interest including places in Europe like Budingen.  It also chronicles the departure from Russia, the forced relocation to Siberia and the far East, an expanded First Settlers list, surnames, and research options.  It was prepared by the Walter Research team, with help from others.  It is the result of over 30 years of collected information that is finally being made available. It is not for sale - but is given as a gift to those people who donate at least $50 to the Walter records project to reimburse Doris Evans who purchased the original records. The method to donate is being publicized on the Frank and Walter Facebook pages.  It is a remarkable CD that will be treasured by Walter descendants and give them a long overdue picture of their village. We hope that it will be an inspiration to other VC's to do something similar.

     

    The Walter Data Bank is currently at 41,197 individuals and continues to grow.  This will be expanded greatly as we are able to add the new Walter records from Volgograd into the system. We still have a substantial gap in records between 1798 and 1839.

     

    Walter only has the original First Settlers List and the 1798 census and we are still unable to obtain the later census records that so many other villages have been able to get. We are fortunate in that the FSL is detailed and Jean Roth continues to research the FSL origins and has made substantial progress in identifying the place of origin in Germany and verifying records there for our original Walter settlers. The receipt of the new book on the Kuhlburg lists is hepful, but not as detailed as anticipated.

     

    We have a Walter Website - link from AHSGR maintained by Teresa Sardina which contains a history of the village and a number of Photos.  We also have a Facebook site added this year maintained by Village Coordinator Michael Fyler which now has 107 members. Through Facebook we have made many new Walter contacts including substantial numbers from South America.  Michael has language ability in both German and Spanish and is able to answer queries. We have also had one query from Russia and another from Germany. We have a number of Pleve charts which have helped to fill in missing links.

     

    The increased cooperation of the VC's from other nearby villages and those in the Wolost of Frank has been very helpful and will be very important in the future.  We also appreciate all the translation work being done for Dr. Brent Mai at the Center for Volga German Studies at Concordia University in Portland, Oregon.



    Jean A. Roth, Mary Mills, and Michael Fyler

    Village Coordinators for Walter and Walter Khutor

     

  • Warenburg, Samara, Volga

    2010 Village Report
     
    I have had the following inquiries for Warenburg ths year:  Molko (2),  Gobel (2), Stumpf (2), Pfeiffer, Enelhardt, Yost, Schmall, Kaiser, Freund, Leisle, Dein, and Nickel.
     
    Brent Mai says he is in the process of translating the 1850 and 1857 Warenburg census records.  It will be a big help when these census records are published.
     
    I am still publishing two issues of the Warenburg newsletter every year.  I have received photos, obituaries, parochial certificates, and other items of interest from people with Warenburg ancestors.  I have been grateful to receive this information.

     
    Warenburg had 179 families, 543 colonists arriving on 12 May 1767.  Pleve's new book, Volume 4, has all of these colonists listed, their place of  origin, father's occupation and age, wife's name and age--but no maiden name,  and children's names and ages.  Pleve's Kuhlburg List book shows the colonists arriving in Oranienburg, Russia in 1766--with the parents names  but no ages for the parents, former residence, occupation of the father,  children and their ages, date of arrival in Oranienburg, name of the ship, and  name of the ship's captain.  I have been able to find people (including some of my ancestors) who were alive in 1766 and had died before they reached  Warenburg.  I never would have known their name without finding them in the Kuhlburg List book.  Sometimes the Kuhlburg list had a more specific area from which the colonists came---town instead of just an area.  I have found the birth record in Germany of a few colonists.  Looking through the old German writing on microfilm is hard and it takes awhile to find a record.
     
    I had a complied book about Warenburg and a Warenburg brochure on the Heritage Hall table at the Lincoln convention.

     

    Sharon White
    Village Coordinator for Warenburg

     

  • Wiesenmüller, Samara, Volga
    2010 Village Report

    Village Coordinator: CWO Hugh Lichtenwald, US Army, (Ret.)
     
    It has been a busy year. My Email folder indicates I have received 183 Emails concerning the Village of Wiesenmueller. To date there have been no dissatisfied customers.
     
    In November 2009, I sent a copy of the Wiesenmueller database to AHSGR for inclusion in the Village Files. Since then the number of souls in the database has increased from 9,451 to 11,298. I will send AHSGR an updated version soon.
     
    In 2009 the Wiesenmueller database was posted on Rootsweb's WorldConnect website and this year it has also been posted to Ancestry.com and MyHeritage.com. The MyHeritage site has been particularly useful in that it is favored by non-US GRs over Ancestry and Rootsweb. A basic MyHeritage database posting is free (as it also is at Rootsweb), as long as the site manager does not wish to add photos and other "bells and whistles." MyHeritage is a multi-lingual site and is a bit more difficult to navigate than Ancestry or Rootsweb but it offers researchers here in the US the opportunity of interfacing with GRs from other lands.
     
    I continue to maintain SKYPE contact with some Wiesenmueller  descendants in Germany and Russia.
     
    Some reports from the  Engels Archive  "Family Lists" were forwarded to me this year and I discovered that Engels charges non-residents exactly twice the fee that they charge those residing in Russia. Anyone interested in obtaining such data from Engels might want to cultivate a Russian acquaintance and have them order the data at the lower rate. I have commissioned one such report through an acquaintance in Russia and expect to receive a copy it before the end of this year.
     
    The Jeruslan Nachrichten Website, Webmisressed by Sue Kottwitz, continues to be a resource for Jeruslan River Colonies researchers and has a great amount of information cocerning the Village of Wiesenmueller and its families.
     
    Hugh Lichtenwald, from the farm in Monetta, SC
    VC, Wiesenmueller


  • Wittman (Soloturn), Samara, Volga

     

     

  • Worms, Berezan, Odessa, Kherson

    2010 Village Report

    Beresan District, Odessa Ukraine

     

    Worms and Rohrbach are only about four miles apart and about sixty miles northeast of Odessa.  There was a great deal of intermarriage between the two villages, and most of the Reformed church members were baptized in Rohrbach.  Consequently, it is difficult to separate inquiries between Worms and Rohrbach.

     

    I probably received twenty inquiries about family members from the two villages and have referred them to the Personal Ancestral File (PAF) data for these two villages. I've also referred them to the Odessa project.  Most inquiries are from individuals in the United States although one individual lives in Germany.  A major part of his family, however, settled in the United States.

     

    In the process of corresponding with individuals regarding inquiries, I have discovered two new family members who are distant relatives.  I also received correspondence and family histories, some of which describes what happened to those who remained in Russia.  These histories have provided insight into Stalin's Holocaust and some of the material was used in a recent AHSGR Journal.  Most of the contacts have been the result of my website, www.jimgriess.net.  Since its inception, the website has received 16,455 hits. Three of my relatives and I will be traveling to the Ukraine this summer to visit Worms, Rohrbach, the Ochsner Estates, and other locations along the North Shore of the Black Sea. 

     

    Jim Griess          

    Village Coordinator for Rohrbach and Worms

     

     

  • 2010 VC Report
     
    In 2010 we had only a handful of inquiries from descendants--some from the United States and a couple from Germany. Through the generous efforts of one of our village descendants, we were able to digitize all 30 years of Usu Leut newsletters into PDF format and offer it for sale to those who would like all of the back issues on compact disk. We published one issue in 2010, and will do one more issue this month.
     
    After a decade of service, Patrice Miller and I have decided to turn the reins of Yagodnaya Polyana’s village coordinators over to the next generation. We will be seeking volunteers through the next newsletter. We will continue to support all efforts to connect descendants with resources for our beloved "Berry Meadow", but have realized that work and family responsibilities keep us from serving as well as we'd like. Yagodnaya Polyana was a vibrant village for our ancestors, and we are confident that one (or two, or three) of the many dedicated descendants will step up to continue the efforts of Georg Kromm, Richard Scheuerman, Bill Scheirman, Elizabeth Meyer, and many, many others.
     
    We want to express our deepest gratitude to our fellow Village Coordinators and to everyone at AHSGR who have been so supportive and generous over the years. We look forward to seeing you at upcoming AHSGR conventions!
     
    Merry Christmas,


    Kris Ball and Patrice Miller
    Village Coordinators for Yagodnaya Polyana

     

  •  

     

  • 2010 Village

    I received only a few inquiries for Zürich (also known as Eckardt) this past year.  I was able to give some limited information in these cases, with the intent of following up with more detail when more recent census information is available, in particular the 1857 census.

    I continue to add to my database, and ever so slowly it grows.  There will be more to come.

    Keith Wilberg
    Village Coordinator for Zürich